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CAPSS' NEWS

The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and its Connecticut State Chapter, Connecticut Education Technology Leaders Association (CTETL), are pleased to collaborate with the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) to support the work of current and aspiring superintendents and district leadership teams in leading all aspects of digital learning transformations.

CoSN Resources to Support Smart Educational Networks.
The impact of COVID-19 and the rapid move to Remote Learning have underscored the importance of school districts creating and maintaining robust reliable Internet networks. Education networks have evolved from addressing district operational and administrative needs to serving students and teachers in and beyond the classroom, anywhere and anytime. Innovative technologies, more access to the Internet, and powerful communication, creation, and collaboration tools are driving instructional transformation. Rapid change is increasing demand for greater network capacity and reliability. CoSN is pleased to provide district leaders with information resources to help them make effective and sustainable high-stakes infrastructure investment decisions. CoSN’s one-page document identifies six core characteristics of the “new” network to include in your school district’s  network design and planning. The CoSN SEND Initiative website provides multiple tools and resources, including comprehensive guidelines, a checklist for School System Chief Technology Officers, an Action Toolkit, and much more.

CoSN/AASA/edWeb.net EmpowerED Superintendent Monthly Webinar
“Smart Education Networks by Design: The CoSN SEND Initiative”.
The next installment of the CoSN/AASA/edWeb.net EmpowerED Superintendent webinar series is scheduled for Monday, July 13 at 5:00 pm ET. Now, more than ever, school networks must serve students and teachers both inside and outside the classroom, anywhere and anytime. You will not want to miss this webinar when three school superintendents – including Connecticut’s own Dr. Mark Benigni, Superintendent Meriden Public Schools - share how their districts make high-stakes technology investment decisions in the midst of constantly changing technology, teaching and learning priorities, and funding. Dr. Benigni will be joined by Dr. John Marcus, Superintendent Stoughton Public Schools, MA and Matthew Miller, Superintendent Lakota Local Schools, OH. Learn more and register for this free webinar at: https://home.edweb.net/webinar/supers20200713/

COVID-19 & Reopening School Resources for School Leaders
CoSN continues to provide school leaders with updated information on the "EdTech Guidance in the age of COVID-19” web page. School leaders have ready access to current resources that not only help school systems adapt to remote learning during COVID-19 as well as help in planning how to reopen schools for the 2020-2021 school year.

If your school or district would like more information about joining CoSN or getting more involved with CoSN, please contact Brian Calvary, CAE, CoSN Director of Membership and Chapters, at bcalvary@cosn.org.

Dates: July 13-17, 2020

The RESC Alliance is excited to announce the first annual Virtual Learning Institute. During the week of July 13, the institute will host 60+ sessions over five days, providing educators with the opportunity to exchange innovative ideas and explore solutions to help our students, families, and educators navigate learning in our new era. The institute will offer highly engaging and interactive collaborative learning sessions facilitated by esteemed and accomplished educators from across the state. Each day of the institute will be framed by one of four themes:

  • Reframing Education in the Digital Age
  • Addressing the Social- Emotional Learning Imperative
  • Engaging Students in Blended and Virtual Experiences (2 days)
  • Committing to Continuous Professional Learning

More Information/Registration

Founded in 1956, Antinozzi Associates is celebrating over 60 years of Design Leadership in Architecture and Interior Design. Our firm has been a leader in institutional design with a focus on K-12 public school design, working with countless municipalities throughout Connecticut, and completing hundreds of school projects during this time.

The experience we have gained in educational design has allowed our team to learn new methodologies and bring new design thinking to each project in regard to developing 21st Century Learning Environments, implementing a collaborative design process to meet budget and schedule, and creating attractive (yet functional) school spaces.

https://www.antinozzi.com/

Contact
F. Michael Ayles, FAIA
Principal, Business Development
(203) 551-2422

Bay Path University’s Certificate in Online Learning & Teaching is in partnership with the National Institute of Online Learning. The certificate program can be run in two ways depending on your audience's preference. One, completely self-paced through asynchronous learning. Or two, a cohort-based model with blended asynchronous and synchronous learning through discussion board posts and social online community led by a facilitator. The program demonstrates how to make a smooth transition from face-to-face to virtual instruction.

Contact for more information:
Sarah MacDonald
(413) 565-1555 

This is the first in a series of blog posts based on HMH’s recent report titled The Connected Learning Era: Mitigating the COVID-19 Learning Loss.
 
This is an unprecedented time for education and the world. All of us are living history, and our children and youth will be defined in part by their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. While we prepare for their return to school for the 2020-21 academic year, we don’t know precisely where or how we will get started. But what we know for sure is that the well-being of students and the social justice issues being raised are the top concerns of educators and communities...

Read more

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) published in May 2020 its “interim guidance” for reopening various sectors of our communities, including schools.  The guidance provides the CDC’s “recommendations to keep communities safe while resuming peer-to-peer learning and providing crucial support for parents and guardians returning to work.”  

Interim Guidance on Scaling Up School Operations
The CDC’s interim guidance for schools is laid out in a series of three steps designed to inform a gradual “scaling up” of operations based on the “scope and nature of community mitigation.” For each step, the CDC provides recommendations and safety actions designed to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 as schools begin to reopen.  The interim guidance does not specify how or when a school would advance from one step to another.

Step 1 - Schools that are currently closed, remain closed. E-learning or distance learning opportunities should be provided for all students. Support provision of student services such as school meal programs, as feasible. Camps should be restricted to children of essential workers and for children who live in the local geographic area only.”

Step 2 - Remain open with enhanced social distancing measures and for     children who live in the local geographic area only.”

 The interim guidance does not address how such restrictions would be applied in the context of magnet schools, inter-district programs or independent schools.  

 “Step 3 -  Remain open with distancing measures. Restrict attendance to those from limited transmission areas (other Step 3 areas) only.”

The interim guidance provides recommendations that are specific to each “step.” For example, there are very specific recommendations regarding such matters as the spacing and direction of desks, mixing of student groups, food service operations, restrictions on visitors to schools and numerous other educational functions.  Additionally, there are many measures that are universally applicable to all steps.  Those measures include: promoting healthy hygiene practices; intensifying cleaning, disinfection and ventilation; limiting sharing materials; training all staff; checking for signs and symptoms of COVID-19; and planning for when a staff member, student, or visitor becomes sick.  

With regard to face coverings in particular, the interim guidance recognizes that “face coverings may be challenging for students (especially younger students) to wear in all-day settings such as school.”  The guidance goes on to recommend that “face coverings should be worn by staff and encouraged in students (particularly older students) if feasible and are most essential in times when physical distancing is difficult.”   
Additionally, the CDC explains that the following should be maintained during each step:

  • Establish and maintain communication with local and State authorities to determine current mitigation levels in your community.
  • Protect and support staff and students who are at higher risk for severe illness, such as by providing options for telework and virtual learning.
  • Follow CDC’s Guidance for Schools and Childcare Programs.
  • Provide teachers and staff from higher transmission areas (earlier Step areas) telework and other options as feasible to eliminate travel to schools and camps in lower transmission (later Step) areas and vice versa.
  • Encourage any other external community organizations that use the facilities also follow this guidance.

Next Steps
The CDC interim guidance is one piece in an evolving puzzle related to the reopening of schools.  The Governor and the Commissioner of Education are engaged in addressing the multitude of considerations associated with the reopening of schools. For example, on June 1, 2020, the Governor issued the document, Rules for operating Summer School during COVID-19.  It authorized Superintendents to begin in-person summer school classes on July 6, 2020 only if (1) locations comply with the requirements set forth within the document and with the CDC Decision Tool (available here); and (2) plans have been reviewed with Local Directors of Public Health and school medical advisors, if applicable.  Independent schools and other non-public schools are encouraged to follow the same schedule and guidance.  The guidance concerning school reopening is continuously changing.  Schools should continue to monitor any Executive Orders released by Governor Lamont and guidance from the State Department of Education and relevant state agencies, as they relate to the reopening of schools. Schools should also continue to monitor the CDC and State websites for guidance regarding the same.

Please continue to monitor Shipman & Goodwin’s site for issues related to school law at ctschoollaw.com or our Coronavirus (COVID-19) Resource Center for updates concerning COVID-19. If you have specific questions about this guidance, please contact any member of Shipman & Goodwin’s School Law Group.

The disruption from school closings is hard to navigate, but like you, the College Board is committed to ensuring rising seniors don’t lose college planning momentum. The College Board Opportunity Scholarships program guides students through important steps in the college planning process at their own pace at home. When students take the first two steps—exploring colleges and practicing for the SAT® — they’ll qualify for $500 and $1,000 scholarships just by getting ready for college. And they don’t even have to get off the couch.

  • Help Students Build a College List: This $500 scholarship closes on July 31st for the Class of 2021. Students can use their mobile phones or any other device to build a starter list of colleges using Big Future
  • Support your students with SAT practice: Students become eligible for a $1,000 scholarship when they practice for at least 6 hours with Official SAT Practice on Khan Academy®
  • For more information, please see this this resource from the College Board Opportunity Scholarships program to share with your staff. It’s important to encourage CT students to complete the first step: building a college list by July 31st so they do not miss out on a chance to win $40,000 for college. This resource for educators during COVID-19 helps explain how to support students in signing up for this college planning scholarship program and complete the first two steps: Build Your College List and Practice for the SAT!

In Connecticut, just 10% of the students in the Class of 2021 are signed up for the Opportunity Scholarship program.  Since January, there have been 71 winners in Connecticut representing nearly 40 districts.  The more students that sign up, the greater the chances that CT students will win money in the monthly national drawings.  When students win, we notify both the student winners and their respective high school principal to ensure that students redeem their scholarship dollars.  In our most recent drawing, the following districts had student winners:  Bridgeport, Learn, New Canaan, New Haven, Newtown, Region 5, and South Windsor.  Let’s get 100% of the Class of 2021 signed up.
 
The Fall SAT is in high demand
We are anticipating a high volume of SAT® test takers this fall due to the missed testing opportunities students faced in the spring.  The August, September, and October test administrations in particular provide students with an opportunity to take the SAT before submitting their college applications.  Many weekend test centers in Connecticut are nearing capacity and we need your help.
 
As we look to expand capacity to accommodate students impacted by test center closures this past spring, there are two options that can help.  The first is to consider opening your school as a weekend SAT test center in the early fall (August 29th and/or September 26th and/or October 3rd SAT administrations).  The first step in the process is filling out the SAT test center interest form:  https://collegeboard.tfaforms.net/63.  After completing the form, we will get back to you requesting additional information, such as estimated capacity and preferred test dates.  The process is not complicated.
 
The other option that can help is for your school to offer fall SAT School Day.  There are two dates for increased flexibility:  September 23rd and October 14th.  SAT School Day expands access because students do not have to worry about locating a weekend test center, testing will not disrupt weekend plans, and students test in familiar surroundings.  Schools that are interested order their SAT School Day in the College Board test ordering system – the same online site where you order the PSAT/NMSQT®.  As you know, the CSDE will pay the cost of one SAT test administration for Class of 2021 public school students this fall, either during a weekend administration or during an SAT School Day. Information about what is covered can be found in the Question and Answer document located on the CSDE webpage.   
 
Whether you choose to become a weekend SAT test center and/or an SAT School Day site, you will be providing your students with access to a globally recognized college admission test that is accepted at all U.S colleges and can open doors to admissions, scholarships, and financial aid opportunities.

The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and its Connecticut State Chapter, Connecticut Education Technology Leaders Association (CTETL), are pleased to collaborate with the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) to support the work of current and aspiring superintendents and district leadership teams in leading all aspects of digital learning transformations.

EmpowerED Superintendent edWebinar – Monday, June 8, 2020 at 5:00 pm ET
“Digital Equity Strategies for Learning Beyond the Classroom” - Recording Now Available

On Monday, June 8, CoSN, AASA and edWeb co-hosted their monthly EmpowerED Superintendent webinar. The focus for the June 8 webinar was “Digital Equity Strategies for Learning Beyond the Classroom”. Even though this webinar topic and date had been on the schedule for nearly a year, the direct relevance to today’s learning environment was not lost on anyone. Over 3,000 people registered to participate in last Monday’s webinar. Dr. David Miyashiro, Superintendent, Cajon Valley School District, CA, Dr. Steven Webb, Superintendent, Vancouver Public Schools, WA and Dr. Donna Wright, Director of Schools, Wilson County Schools, TN, were the featured superintendent guest panelists. They engaged in a lively, interactive, informative conversation. The webinar participants responded enthusiastically to the effective strategies these three nationally recognized superintendents shared regarding their school districts’ approaches to solving the challenges around equity in general and digital inequity specifically. If you were not able to attend the live webinar broadcast, you can access the recording, for no charge, at this URL link: https://home.edweb.net/webinar/supers20200608/

“Smart Education Networks by Design: The CoSN SEND Initiative” – Next up on Monday, July 13 at 5:00 pm ET.
The next installment of the CoSN/AASA/edWeb EmpowerED Superintendent webinar is scheduled for Monday, July 13 at 5:00 pm ET. Now, more than ever, school networks must serve students and teachers both inside and outside the classroom, anywhere and anytime. Rapid change in the way teaching and learning is delivered is increasing the demand for greater network capacity and reliability. You will not want to miss this webinar when three school superintendents – including Connecticut’s own Dr. Mark Benigni, Superintendent Meriden Public Schools - share how their districts make high-stakes infrastructure investment decisions in the midst of constantly changing technology, teaching and learning priorities, and funding. Dr. Benigni will be joined by Dr. John Marcus, Superintendent Stoughton Public Schools, MA and Matthew Miller, Superintendent Lakota Local Schools, OH. Learn more and register for this free webinar at: https://home.edweb.net/webinar/supers20200713/

Digital Equity – AASA/CoSN Partner Resources Available to Download
The one-page document, Creating Equitable Opportunities for ALL Learners, provides education leaders with five essential strategies for achieving digital equity. CoSN’s Digital Equity Initiative web page has a number of additional resources, including access to the Digital Equity Toolkit, to support the work of school leaders in building meaningful community partnerships and creating tools to help district leaders achieve digital equity for all learners.

COVID-19 Resources for School Leaders
CoSN continues to provide school leaders with updated information on the "EdTech Guidance in the age of COVID-19” web page. School leaders have ready access to current resources that not only help school systems adapt to remote learning during COVID-19 but also ensure positive outcomes for all stakeholders

If your school or district would like more information about joining CoSN or getting more involved with CoSN, please contact Brian Calvary, CAE, CoSN Director of Membership and Chapters, at bcalvary@cosn.org.

“Public education is our greatest pathway to opportunity in America…”
— Former First Lady Michelle Obama

The Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) stands with our nation in anger and grief over the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. These three lives, needlessly ended, are the most recent manifestations of historic and systemic racism that permeates our society, our institutions and our laws perpetuating discrimination against people of color.

These events represent yet another blow to communities of color, which are disproportionately suffering and dying from the COVID-19 pandemic. Blacks and Latinos represent the majority of those employed in front-line retail, restaurants, transportation, delivery and hospitality sectors who have lost employment. Without income, they are now challenged to pay their bills, put food on their tables, and support their children’s education through distance learning while often not having the technology and support required for online learning.

We at CAPSS condemn all acts of violence, overt and covert, against Black and Latino communities. We also condemn the systems in place that promote and sustain discrimination against people of color. As an educational organization, we have a moral imperative to fight for justice for all people regardless of race, ethnicity, country of origin, religion, gender, gender identification, or intellectual ability. We also have an obligation to address within our schools any hostile environments, discriminatory attitudes and biased actions against students and families of color, knowing such actions limit their opportunities for success and cause them to distrust our schools.

Education is the strongest weapon we have to address the racial and economic disparities that have plagued our nation since its inception. Connecticut’s public school teachers must work every day to uphold ideals of equality, fairness, justice and democracy. It is essential to provide our students – every student – with the skills, knowledge and dispositions to succeed. This requires that every student is reading by grade three, because this is the most important predictor of success.

To achieve these goals, we must be vigilant in ensuring that the needs of each and every student is met. We must work tirelessly to create environments in which every student can grow and thrive emotionally, socially and academically.

As we head into a new school year, we will be challenged to help students and parents cope with upheaval, economic uncertainty and fear for their future. We must remain sensitive to the tremendous stress our students and families have experienced over the past few months.

While progress has been made in addressing the conditions, attitudes and environments that foment inequity, more has to be done to address the devastating impact of COVID-19 and civil rights abuses on economic inequality and mental health.

Historical inequities – and the resulting societal wounds laid bare in 2020 – will not be solved immediately or easily.

Governor Lamont, the state department of education, our school districts, educators and community leaders have been important collaborators with CAPSS in addressing these issues. This model of collaboration promises to help our state address and eliminate the roadblocks that perpetuate racial, social and educational disparities.

CAPSS’ October 2019 statement on schools’ role in addressing racial injustice:
Statement Regarding Issues Around Racial Intolerance

Resources to help families during Covid-19:
Dealing with Covid-19 Resources For Supporting Families

The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and its Connecticut State Chapter, Connecticut Education Technology Leaders Association (CTETL), are pleased to collaborate with the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) to support the work of current and aspiring superintendents and district leadership teams in leading all aspects of digital learning transformations.

EmpowerED Superintendent edWebinar – Monday, June 8, 2020 at 5:00 pm ET
“Digital Equity Strategies for Learning Beyond the Classroom”

CoSN, AASA and edWeb join together in co-hosting the monthly EmpowerED Superintendent webinar series. Given the current challenges involved with continuing teaching and learning in the midst of multiple school closures, the role of school leaders in leading digital transformation is now more urgent and relevant than ever. Join us for the next EmpowerED Superintendent edWebinar when Dr. David Miyashiro, Superintendent, Cajon Valley School District, CA, Dr. Steven Webb, Superintendent, Vancouver Public Schools, WA and Dr. Donna Wright, Director of Schools, Wilson County Schools, TN, come together to engage in a lively, interactive, informative conversation. These three nationally honored superintendents will share their strategies for bringing schools and communities together to solve the challenges of equity in general and digital inequity in particular. Their stories and expertise have great value for all school leaders at this pivotal time for K-12 education. You are invited to register for this free webinar, as well as access recordings of previously broadcast “EmpowerED Superintendent” webinars, at https://home.edweb.net/supers/.

Digital Equity – AASA/CoSN Partner Resources Available to Download
The one-page document, Creating Equitable Opportunities for ALL Learners, provides education leaders with five essential strategies for achieving digital equity. CoSN’s Digital Equity Initiative web page has a number of additional resources, including access to the Digital Equity Toolkit, to support the work of school leaders in building meaningful community partnerships and creating tools to help district leaders achieve digital equity for all learners.

COVID-19 Resources for School Leaders
CoSN continues to provide school leaders with updated information on the "EdTech Guidance in the age of COVID-19” web page. School leaders have ready access to current resources that not only help school systems adapt to remote learning during COVID-19 but also ensure positive outcomes for all stakeholders

If your school or district would like more information about joining CoSN or getting more involved with CoSN, please contact Brian Calvary, CAE, CoSN Director of Membership and Chapters, at bcalvary@cosn.org.

The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and its Connecticut State Chapter, Connecticut Education Technology Leaders Association (CTETL), are pleased to collaborate with the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) to support the work of current and aspiring superintendents and district leadership teams in leading all aspects of digital learning transformations.

EmpowerED Superintendent edWebinar – Monday, June 8, 2020 at 5:00 pm ET
“Digital Equity Strategies for Learning Beyond the Classroom

CoSN, AASA and edWeb join together in co-hosting the monthly EmpowerED Superintendent webinar series. The current COVID-19 health crisis has sharply exposed the critical issues around digital equity in several profound ways. Join us for the next EmpowerED Superintendent edWebinar when Dr. David Miyashiro, Superintendent, Cajon Valley School District, CA, Dr. Steven Webb, Superintendent, Vancouver Public Schools, WA and Dr. Donna Wright, Director of Schools, Wilson County Schools, TN, come together to engage in a lively, interactive, informative conversation. The three superintendents will share their strategies for bringing schools and communities together to solve the challenges of digital inequity. Their stories and expertise have great value for all school leaders at this pivotal time for K-12 education. You are invited to register for this free webinar, as well as access recordings of previously broadcast “EmpowerED Superintendent” webinars, at https://home.edweb.net/supers/.

Digital Equity – AASA/CoSN Partner Resources Available to Download
The one-page document, Creating Equitable Opportunities for ALL Learners, provides education leaders with five essential strategies for achieving digital equity. CoSN’s Digital Equity Initiative web page has a number of additional resources, including access to the Digital Equity Toolkit, to support the work of school leaders in building meaningful community partnerships and creating tools to help district leaders achieve digital equity for all learners.

COVID-19 Resources for School Leaders
CoSN continues to provide school leaders with updated information on the "EdTech Guidance in the age of COVID-19” web page. School leaders have ready access to current resources that not only help school systems adapt to remote learning during COVID-19 but also ensure positive outcomes for all stakeholders

If your school or district would like more information about joining CoSN or getting more involved with CoSN, please contact Brian Calvary, CAE, CoSN Director of Membership and Chapters, at bcalvary@cosn.org.

Our retired committee is very active and helpful with problems of practice for superintendents. If you are retiring and would like to remain a member of CAPSS or just stay in touch, please forward your name, address, telephone number, and personal email address to Dionisia Markopoulos at dmarkopoulos@capss.org.

Connecticut Center for School Change - logo

District and community leaders face complex choices in the coming weeks and months as they begin to plan for the 2020-21 school year and re-imagine the school systems they want to re-open for their students. This is unprecedented work without simple answers. In this re-opening workshop, the CCSC staff will help district teams use powerful frameworks, apply research and tools for determining the most critical questions, and design optimal answers related to four topic areas: planning and governance, teaching and learning, wellness, and operations.

This design workshop consists of four 90-minute sessions, each with tools, access to leading research and practice, and opportunities for district teams to collaborate. In addition, each team will receive a full day of coaching from a designated staff member.

Module Dates:
May 27, 2020
June 3, 2020
June 10, 2020
June 24, 2020

Cost - $2900*
Price per district team includes four online modules, tools and templates, as well as a day of personalized coaching
*Districts with a 2019-2020 contract have a reduced rate of $2500

Register today to reserve your space!

Register

Many of us are deeply affected by the anxiety and uncertainty of the coronavirus crisis. We can’t accelerate a resolution to this pandemic but there is something you can do: share your experience. 

Our friends at the Child Mind Institute have launched CrisisLogger.org to assess the impact of the coronavirus crisis on mental health and provide parents, educators, health workers, students and others with a way to express their feelings that will also help other families.

Here’s how it works:

  • Share your fears, frustrations, and hopes in the form of an audio clip or video
  • You can share this publicly or you can choose to make them private
  • Answer a few questions to learn more about your situation.
  • The Child Mind Institute will analyze this information to generate recommendations for better resources to support you and others

We hope that you'll take a few minutes to participate and help researchers develop better mental health resources for children and families, and the educators who work with them. Your feelings during Covid-19 really do matter!

CrisisLogger.org

The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and its Connecticut State Chapter, Connecticut Education Technology Leaders Association (CTETL), are pleased to collaborate with CAPSS to support the work of current and aspiring superintendents and district leadership teams in leading all aspects of digital learning transformations.

COVID-19
CoSN has created a special web page with resources for school leaders as they deal with our current national health emergency. "CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) EDTECH GUIDANCE" is available at https://www.cosn.org/coronavirus. Under the “CoSN Resources” tab you are able to access the following documents: “Video Conferencing Tools in the Age of Remote Learning: Privacy Considerations for New Technologies”;  “Preparing To Take Your Schools Online”; “Cybersecurity Consideration in a COVID-19 World”.  You can also access a recent webinar presented in partnership with AASA titled, “Virtual Collaboration and Learning Continuity”.

Resources will continue to be added in the weeks and months ahead.

COSN 2020 – Going Virtual
The 2020 CoSN Annual Conference that was originally scheduled to be held in mid-March in Washington DC is now going forward as a lively interactive virtual conference scheduled for May 17-21. Learn more and join CoSN 2020: A Breakthrough Virtual Experience by accessing this web page: https://cosnconference.org/cosn2020-is-going-virtual/

Strategic Technology Planning & Investment – CoSN Resources
A one-page document, Strategic Technology Planning and Investment provides leaders with three essential focal points for SmartIT decisions. The SMART IT web page features a new resource created in collaboration with the Association of School Business Officials (ASBO) along with additional information on total cost of ownership, value of investment and more.

The Empowered Superintendent edWebinar Series – Monday, May 11, 2020, 5:00 pm ET
“Strategic Technology Planning: Aligning Priorities, Costs, Outcomes and Sustainability”
CoSN, in partnership with edWeb.net, hosts The Empowered Superintendent monthly edWebinar series on topics that are essential for all educators engaged in leading digital transformations. Technology has never played a more crucial role than today in schools being able to continue teaching and learning for all students. Join superintendents Dr. Jeanne Barker, Dr. Chris Gaines and Dr. Randy Ziegenfuss in a lively interactive conversation as they share their strategies for technology planning and sustainability. Each will also update webinar participants on how they are leading learning in their school districts during the current COVID-19 health crisis. Their stories and expertise have great value for all school leaders. You are invited to register for this free webinar, as well as access recordings of previously broadcast CoSN/edWeb webinars, at https://home.edweb.net/supers/.

If your school or district would like more information about joining CoSN or getting more involved with CoSN, please contact Brian Calvary, CAE, CoSN Director of Membership and Chapters, at bcalvary@cosn.org.

Safeguard your students, employees, and visitors with preliminary screening measures and immediate detection. Contact your local sales team with questions, or to setup a remote demonstration. Founded in 2001, Hikvision is the world’s largest CCTV manufacturer providing cameras, recorders, and associated peripherals to our partners globally.

David Laprise
Senior Sales Engineer CT
(401) 683-8753
David.laprise@hikvision.com

Kevin McKay
Regional Sales Manager CT
(617) 930-3361
Kevin.mckay@hikvision.com

More Information

Summer Start | 15 Credits

Quinnipiac University’s online Certificate in Social and Emotional Learning and School Climate is designed to address the current and pressing need for systematic changes to school climate to enhance learning for K-12 students and secure safe schools. The program draws from interdisciplinary expertise and provides the skills needed to affect both the individual and structural changes required to promote a school-based environment that is safe, supportive, effective and equitable.

As a student in the program, you will work collaboratively with other educators and administrators in our flexible online classroom. Your coursework will explore the necessary policy and procedural considerations required for SEL and climate improvement, culminating in the development and implementation of an action plan to benefit your own school environment. Throughout your studies, you will work closely with our experienced faculty, who will mentor and guide you throughout the creation of your plan.

Learn more today by visiting online.qu.edu or calling 877-403-4277

Download the flyer

This webinar is open to you and all teachers and administrators in your district.

Please join Dr. Marc Brackett, from the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, and Dr. Betty Sternberg from the Teacher Fellowship Program at CCSU for the SEL Best Practices for Supporting Educators and Students During Distance Learning” webinar on Tuesday, May 12th, @4pm EDT.

In this interactive webinar, we will learn from teachers and building and district leaders around CT who are committed to high-quality SEL implementation during distance learning. We will hear how (1) superintendents are applying emotional intelligence to virtual district leadership, (2) principals are using SEL tools and principles to support a positive school climate and teacher wellness, and (3) educators are providing students with uninterrupted SEL instruction using different SEL approaches, including RULER, the evidence-based approach to SEL developed at Yale.

To learn more about the Yale Center for Emotional intelligence, please visit https://www.ycei.org/

To learn more about the Teacher Leader Fellowship Institute, please visit https://www.ccsu.edu/seps/TLFP/teacherLeaderInstitute.html

Register

The CT Office of Higher Education recently published Connecticut Institutions of Higher Education 2020 Almanac that contains all of the posts-secondary higher education options within the state.

For students, this valuable document puts the many learning opportunities that await our seniors in one easy to access location; for Mom’s, Dad’s, future college freshmen and upcoming workforce candidates, this almanac offers a blueprint for the next immediate step. By providing a wealth of data in a highly visible and easy to process manner, it simplifies the complex process that students face as they determine their future.

View/download the Higher Education Almanac

In light of the passing of Public Act No. 19-12 An Act Concerning the Inclusion of Black and Latino Studies in the Public School Curriculum in June 2015, the State Education Resource Center (SERC) is facilitating Virtual Focus Groups to garner stakeholder input. These focus groups will provide administrators, educators, students, families, and community members the opportunity to weigh in on essential content/topics and concepts that they’d like to see included in the model, statewide curriculum.

MORE INFORMATION

As the COVID-19 outbreak transforms our education system, emotionally intelligent leadership from administrators and school boards becomes more and more critical.

Watch Dr. Marc Brackett and Scott Levy from the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence present a webinar on Leading with Emotional Intelligence in Uncertain Times.

Watch on YouTube

Keep in touch with the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and stay up to date on resources, webinars, and articles on emotional intelligence and COVID-19 by following our COVID-19 Resources for School Communities webpage:

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Resources for School Communities

The Weather Channel television network is now airing new educational content for families with children currently staying at home due to school closures. The coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic has forced families across the country to transition to at-home learning, and the network is well-equipped to provide kids with a daily dose of science while their schools and classrooms are closed.

The Weather Channel is now dedicating time during each hour of live programming at :50 past the hour to share educational content. Scientific explanations on everything from how raindrops and rainbows form, to why thunder happens, how to stay safe in all kinds of weather, and more. More info can be found here.

Segment examples include:
Soap Experiment with Mark Elliot: Facebook / Twitter / YouTube
Tornado Watch vs. Warning: Facebook / Twitter / YouTube

CONTACT
Sarit Schneider Babboni
101 Marietta St NW, Floor 29, Atlanta, GA
O: 404.334.3545| C: 678.986.0704

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March 13, 2020

Rethink Ed is Committed to Supporting Social-Emotional Wellness During School Closures

Fear and anxiety about the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has led to increased stress levels in both children and adults. School closure, abrupt changes in routine and a heightened sense of uncertainty can also have a detrimental effect on the social, emotional and mental wellbeing of students, educators and school staff. As educators work diligently to prepare and implement virtual academic learning plans, it is equally important to have a contingency plan and resources in place for social emotional learning as well. As our nation faces unprecedented school closings due to COVID-19, Rethink Ed is committed to keeping our students learning and providing schools with resources and tools that extend beyond the classroom.

Rethink Ed will provide districts that are planning closures for preventative health measures with a tool kit that will include webinars, whitepapers, tips and strategies for supporting your entire community during this time of uncertainty. We will offer free access to our online Social Emotional Learning Suite through the remainder of the school year. Please contact us for details.

While this is a difficult time, it is important for us all to continue to focus on our physical, mental, and social emotional health and to work on strategies for helping ourselves and others build resilience and community support.

Social Emotional Learning (SEL) is the foundation for managing emotions, having healthy relationships, understanding and empathizing with others, being responsible and safe, and learning to cope with difficult situations and manage our stress, emotions, anxiety, and fear during this unprecedented situation.

Rethink Ed SEL is a comprehensive K-12 online platform that provides many opportunities for students of all ages and abilities, teachers, administrative staff, and parents to develop their social emotional skills. We provide on-demand professional development videos, grade level videos and curriculum that promotes well-being, connectedness and success for all students and adults. We are committed to supporting you as you navigate through this difficult time.

Sincerely,

Diana Frezza
Senior Vice President
diana.frezza@rethinked.com
49 West 27th St., 8th Floor
New York, NY 10001

rethinkED SEL Goals & Objectives

As school districts across the country are closing or preparing to close as a step toward slowing the spread of COVID-19, JASON Learning offers help for administrators, teachers, students,and parents in their efforts to rapidly transition to remote instruction. We realize that this is a challenging task, made even more so by the circumstances that make it necessary.

JASON’s multidisciplinary curriculum contains a built-in STEM framework for students to learn 21st century skills. As a mission-driven nonprofit, JASON is prepared to do everything in our power to assist by providing our resources and expertise to districts across the country to help ensure that effective STEM teaching and learning continues while schools are closed.

JASON is offering any school district facing closures due to the effects of COVID-19coronavirus free online access to our digital platform and STEM curricula. Access will be made available through the end of April.

JASON will also provide a free series of online webinars to provide additional support to educators using JASON resources to conduct STEM learning activities and effectively manage their students remotely.

To activate district-wide access to JASON’s digital platform, please complete the short online form below. This will allow JASON to quickly configure automatic, “single sign-on” access for all teachers and students in your district, allowing for fast, seamless logins for anyone who wishes to take advantage of our online curriculum.

https://forms.gle/xMdCHTomrkU1M1N56

Our digital library includes hundreds of award-winning online and hands-on activities in science,math, and technology for K-12 students, and our multidisciplinary approach integrates reading and writing skills into every lesson. Videos, articles, games, simulations, and projects can keep students actively engaged. Many hands-on activities are designed to require only basic, easily accessible materials.

Once access is configured for a district, educators and students can easily login using their existing district accounts (Google, Microsoft, etc). Educators can even assign and share JASONr esources directly to their existing Google Classrooms.

JASON takes data privacy very seriously — we do not sell or distribute the personal information of your students or staff. Please see our signed data privacy policy on our website.

WEBSITE

Announcement & Data Privacy Commitment

Connecticut Superintendents and Educational Leaders-
 
Like educators everywhere, we are concerned about the coronavirus’ potential impact on student learning and it is our mission to help affected schools maintain normalcy and continuity during this difficult time. I encourage you to learn about Discovery Education’s Comprehensive Response to the Worldwide Coronavirus Outbreak and our response to Covid-19.
 
Below I’ve provided some important offers and resources to support your schools. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to me directly if you have any questions or wish to connect virtually next week.
 
Discovery Education is a company whose mission is to prepare learners for future success by connecting them to the world outside the classroom. We will continue to monitor this event closely and look for ways to help educators everywhere prepare students for success, no matter where they are.  
 
Sincerely-

John David Son
Senior Manager | Education Partnerships
Discovery Education
M. 270.210.0084
Follow me on Twitter

WAYS TO SUPPORT VIRTUAL LEARNING

With the emergence of confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases in the United States and in communities surrounding Connecticut, Connecticut public school districts should continue planning for the possibility of community spread and responding to concerns regarding COVID-19.  Given the rapidly evolving nature of the COVID-19 outbreak and the information made available to us by public health authorities, it is critical that school districts partner with state and local health officials and regularly consult the latest official guidance as they implement measures to address COVID-19 in their school communities.  The guidance herein is based on the information available as of the date of this publication, including guidance issued on March 6, 2020 by the Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE) and the Connecticut Department of Administrative Services (DAS).

As we all continue to monitor the latest guidance from public health authorities, it is important for school districts to communicate clearly and regularly with families, students (as age-appropriate), and staff on the preventive steps the school district is taking to minimize the spread of any illness and to prepare for any potential outbreak, should it occur within the school community.

Read Compete Publication from Shipman & Goodwin

By: Brenda Iasevoli, Shaped Staff
Submitted by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

This post originally appeared on HMH’s Shaped blog on March 11, 2020

As coronavirus cases rise around the world, people are preparing themselves for a possible outbreak in their community. In that event, health officials may recommend temporarily closing schools to slow the spread of infection.

Ask about the emergency plan at your child’s school or daycare. Then, create a plan of your own. Start by making sure your child has a quiet study area in your house to do schoolwork. "Being in a special learning space helps children to focus," says HMH Chief Research Officer Francie Alexander. "As they settle in, have them set goals, such as 'read two chapters' or 'tackle a math problem.'"

Building a Study Room or Space
Here are four steps for creating the ideal study environment…

Read the complete article

Hosted by: Regional School District No. 18

This 2-Day Instructor training course is designed to teach participants the skills and strategies to increase survivability during the gap between the time a violent event begins, and law enforcement arrives. Upon completion of this course you will be a Certified ALICE instructor and have the knowledge and resources to train others based on your role in the community.

When: August 18-19, 2020, 8am - 5pm

Where: Lyme Old Lyme High School, 68 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT

More Information

REGISTER

New Britain, CT, March 6, 2020: Love the Bus Month was created by the American School Bus Council (ASBC) to provide recognition for school bus drivers, as well as highlight the vital role of the school bus in education. DATTCO, Inc. – one of Connecticut’s largest student transportation providers - just wrapped up a month of celebrations at their school bus yards across Connecticut and Rohde Island. Throughout February, the company celebrated with breakfasts, chocolates on Valentine’s Day, certificates of appreciation, spirit days, and more.

In a thank you letter distributed to each school bus employee, President Don Devivo wrote, “Our school bus workforce is spread across two dozen yards, in two states, and you all set the standard for school busing. Every employee – drivers, monitors, dispatchers, mechanics & technicians, maintenance, safety, operations supervisors, and branch managers – provides a meaningful impact on the company's productivity and success. The part each of you plays in keeping our buses rolling every day and getting students to and from school safely is a critical part, and we couldn’t do it without you.”

Read the Complete Press Release

Equitable logo

The key to a comfortable retirement starts with you! At Equitable, we understand the challenges that come with retirement planning, and are committed to helping you through every stage of life. Whether you are beginning your career, changing jobs, or nearing retirement, you can count on Equitable to help you reach your savings goals. As the #1 provider of 403(b) plans in K-12, we have the experience to make an impact on your financial future. With Equitable, you're not just investing in a 403(b); you're working with a company with a background of nearly 160 years in financial planning support.

www.equitable.com

Contact:
Michael Linehan
Northeast Regional Vice President
Equitable Group Retirement

The AACTE/CAPSS Committee and the Alliance Districts Committee reported on their committee work this year at the CAPSS Board meeting on February 7th, 2020. All of the committee work is incredibly important to CAPSS and determines our priorities for the year. Each month, two committees will report on their work and we will include their summary reports in the Leader's Report.

Fran Rabinowitz
Executive Director
CAPSS

AACTE/CAPSS Joint Committee

Alliance Districts Committee

Beginning the fall 2020 semester, qualified Connecticut residents can pursue a degree or certificate tuition and fee-free. The Pledge to Advance Connecticut, or PACT, will support full-time students who are entering Connecticut community colleges in the fall 2020 semester.

To qualify, students must:

  • Be a graduate of any Connecticut high school, GED or home school program
  • Be a first-time college student
  • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®), and accept all available financial aid
  • Enroll and stay enrolled as full-time students (12 credits per semester)
  • Participate in a degree or credit-bearing certificate program
  • Maintain satisfactory academic progress

View/Download the Flyer

WEBSITE

Classroom audio systems offer many benefits to schools. They have been shown to positively affect student achievement and engagement, as well as reduce fatigue and vocal strain for teachers. Some might argue that audio systems don’t offer the same benefits in today’s classrooms where traditional seating is shifting to flexible seating, and teachers don’t just lecture at the front of the room. How does classroom audio fit into new learning environments? How can teachers use today’s technology in conjunction with classroom audio to enhance the learning experience?

CHANGES IN MODERN CLASSROOMS
Teachers used to spend much of their day sharing information with the class from the front of the room, but teaching methods are changing. Teachers act as facilitators of learning, facilitating class discussions, visiting with small groups, or working with individual students. Class time is now dedicated to students researching and learning in small groups, and students spend more time in front of the class, presenting what they’ve learned. With the classroom environment changed so much, how does sound amplification fit into this mix?

The changes in today’s classroom environment make it even more important for teachers to have a microphone/audio system. As teachers move around the classroom, student seating varies, and the increase in students collaborating, hearing a teacher in the classroom has become more difficult. With a classroom audio system, students can hear the teacher, no matter their location in the room. When teachers need to talk to the class during or after small group work, having their voice distributed throughout the classroom makes it easier for everyone to hear a call to attention. When students are presenting their work with the class, they can also use the teacher microphone, or a separate handheld microphone, to make sure everyone can hear them clearly.

INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY
The advancement of technology in today’s classrooms provides additional options when using classroom audio systems. With a computer and classroom microphone, teachers can use lecture capture—software that allows the teacher to capture a desktop recording along with their voice from the microphone. This will enable teachers to create digital learning opportunities for students who are sick, away for extra-curricular activities, or hospital homebound, providing anywhere anytime learning.

Schools can integrate interactive displays with their classroom audio systems. These displays offer striking visuals, but their sound is not always clear, nor does it always carry well. With audio system integration, sound from presentations and videos can be distributed throughout the classroom, making multimedia more enjoyable for everyone.

Today’s classroom setups and teaching methods are always evolving, and classroom audio systems offer many benefits for teachers and students as a part of this evolution. As teachers use audio enhancement systems to enhance their voice or the voices of their students, lessons can be more engaging and understandable for everyone in the room. As technology is integrated, teachers can take advantage of digital learning opportunities that are created easily with lecture capture software to give students every opportunity to learn. With the increase of student presentations and the use of multimedia use in classrooms, audio systems can optimize technology utilized to create a more engaging environment for everyone.

CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?
In the successful publication of The Seven Secrets of Learning Revealed by Dr. Laurence Martel, Dr. Martel states one of the most important factors of learning is the factor of sound. Dr. Martel explains, “In today’s classrooms, teaching is done by talking. For people to process spoken language, the trainer, or teacher's voice, must be 17db (decibels) louder than the noise in the classroom environment” (The Seven Secrets of Learning Revealed by Dr. Laurence Martel). This is more evident in today’s classrooms than ever, and the use of an audio enhancement system can be a game-changer in the classroom.  

Classrooms are noisy. Even when students are quietly working, you can hear computers humming, clocks ticking, air conditioners thumping, ceiling fans whirring, chairs shifting, feet shuffling, and many other competing sounds. If these sounds are reverberating off linoleum floors and bare walls, the noise level can make it very difficult for students to hear and learn. “It could be argued that all students can benefit from sound amplification, as it creates a more favorable learning environment. If children (and adults) could hear better, clearer, and more consistently, they would have the opportunity to learn more effectively” (The Seven Secrets of Learning Revealed by Dr. Laurence Martel).

It is safe to say that, if students can’t hear the lesson, they can’t understand what’s being taught. Whether it’s the teacher, another student speaking, or one of the many resource’s teachers use now, hearing and understanding material presented is critical to student learning.

CONTACT

Jeff Anderson
President
Audio Enhancement, Inc.
(800) 383-9362

This award is given annually to a UConn graduate who "has made a significant impact on education, has a national reputation for her/his work, has been an inspiration to other professionals, and has shown continued involvement with the Neag School of Education," according to a news release.

Carver will be formally recognized at Neag's 22nd annual Alumni Awards Celebration on March 14, 2020.

Read the Post

Other 2020 Alumni Award Recipients

 

DCF has created a separate unit for school reporting and made some changes in online reporting.

I am grateful to all of you and to the CAPSS Board for ensuring that our voices were heard.

Tom Mooney and Natalia Sieira Millan of Shipman & Goodman have been invaluable in this process. Attached is a post prepared by Tom and Natalia detailing the changes.

I am hopeful that this will be a major step forward.

Fran Rabinowitz
Executive Director, CAPSS

Read/Download the Policy

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt logo

WEBINAR: Experience Amira Assessment! This new classroom assistant driven by artificial intelligence (AI) truly listens to students to accurately assess oral reading fluency (ORF) and screens students who are at risk for dyslexia. Based on the TPRI, developed by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and The University of Texas, the Amira Dyslexia Screener identifies children at risk of dyslexia and employs Rapid Automatic Naming (RAN) and other techniques found to be reliable indicators of the brain function associated with dyslexia.

Listen to the Webinar

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A growing body of research highlights significant positive impact on children who participate in quality afterschool programs. These same benefits extend to school district performance and counteract substantial risks associated with lack of supervision after 3pm. Yet working parent demand far exceeds available programming, and many existing programs just babysit, missing a critical opportunity to provide meaningful enrichment that yields long-term rewards.

What the research says…

BENEFITS to CHILDREN of high quality afterschool programming are significant and long-lasting.

  • Better grades, test scores, and graduation rates; up to 42% increase in math and reading performance; improved overall academic performance for 50%+ attendees
  • 65% have improved homework completion and class participation
  • Improved behavior for nearly 60% of participants

Download the full report

College Board logo

If I asked you “what is the ideal scholarship” you would probably say a scholarship that isn’t based on merit or test scores or GPA because there are plenty of those types of scholarships already and they are limited to the highest performing students. Next, you might say a scholarship that doesn’t require a long list of requirements, such as submitting an essay or gathering recommendations from teachers and counselors or completing a lengthy application process. Next, you would likely say a scholarship that is not a one-and-done, but instead gives students multiple opportunities to win. Lastly, a scholarship that makes money available to students by rewarding them for the steps they are already taking as they prepare for college, with no extra burden and no additional time-consuming stress.

Surprisingly, such a scholarship already exists! It is called the College Board Opportunity Scholarship and is open to all students beginning their junior year of high school. The Opportunity Scholarship was developed last school year and was designed to reward students for taking the steps towards college that research shows will more likely result in them getting there. The best part is that most students are already taking these important actions and the Opportunity Scholarship is just one more incentive to keep students advancing along the path to college.

Read more

Conroy Reading Services

Teachers don’t yet have the skills they need

Just under six years ago, the Connecticut Office of Legislative Research published a report on the status of dyslexia under the state’s special education laws. In January 2015, it became legal for a Planning and Placement Team to diagnose and label a special-education student under the category of Specific Learning Disability/Dyslexia. In that year, many teachers, myself included, had little to no knowledge of how to screen for and assess dyslexia, notice its symptoms, and provide specially designed instruction to a dyslexic student. Yet the International Dyslexia Association estimates that as many as 1 in 5 people worldwide may have some symptoms of dyslexia. If Connecticut serves over half a million students each year, that translates to over 100,000 students who may show a reading-based learning disability or related deficits. Those that don’t qualify for special education services will struggle to keep up with their peers.

Not until 2017 did our state pass legislation requiring teachers applying for special education certification to complete a “program of study in the diagnosis and remediation of reading and language arts that includes...instruction in the detection and recognition of, and evidence-based structured literacy interventions for, students with dyslexia.”  Last year, Connecticut established a task force to analyze the implementation of our dyslexia-related laws. We can and need to do so much more.

Read more

IXL logo

Distinctive Schools runs a network of charter schools with four schools in Chicago and two in the Twin Cities area in Minnesota. They serve an urban population with a high percentage of students qualifying for free and reduced lunch and have many students with special needs. When they implemented the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in 2012, they wanted to find new tools to support students and track progress towards learning goals. IXL helped them transition to the CCSS while empowering teachers and meeting individual student needs.

Building a Flexible Learning Environment
Anthony Claypool, the Director of Curricular Programs and Data for Distinctive Schools, explains that the schools are founded on a personalized learning approach. “It’s important to us that every child has his or her educational needs met,” he says. “Our vision is to get to know students really well and help them know themselves, [including] learning styles, aptitudes, and preferences.” Their research-based learning model is built on the four principles of personalized learning: flexible learning environments, use of learner profiles to plan instruction, mastery-based learning, and individualized learning pathways.

Read more

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Sustainable CT, a statewide nonprofit organization that runs a municipal certification to promote sustainability, equity, and community vibrancy, has recently launched a new funding program, the Community Match Fund. This program, which is open to schools, provides dollar-for-dollar matching funds, up to $25,000 per project, to support projects that make our communities more sustainable. Sustainable CT is already supporting various school projects and encourages schools to apply. Their program has no deadlines, no formal application, no lengthy review period, and minimal reporting requirements.

In order to help project leaders raise funds, Sustainable CT has partnered with ioby, a nonprofit crowdfunding organization that provides an online platform and fundraising coaching and support to help project organizers raise funds. Projects approved for this program will create an online crowdfunding page on ioby that enables them to publicize their projects and solicit contributions. Sustainable CT then matches all donations raised from the community, doubling local investment. In addition to individual donations from the community, Sustainable CT will also match grants, school dollars, municipal dollars, and business contributions, so long as these are part of a community crowdfunding campaign.

While their program is broad and can support many different types of projects, here’s an overview of some of the work that they’re focused on:

  • environmental and climate programs/education                                
  • energy efficiency and renewables                                            
  • composting & recycling
  • food waste reduction
  • community & school gardens
  • arts & culture
  • improving walkability and public transportation
  • land and waterbody use and protection
  • environmental justice
  • creating green spaces
  • promoting and increasing access to healthy and sustainable food networks
  • And much more!

Abe Hilding-Salorio
Community Outreach Manager
Sustainable CT
(860) 465-0256
hildingsalorioa@easternct.edu

Holberton School is a unique alternative to higher education that focuses on training Software and Operations Engineers in two years or less, equipping students from all walks of life with the deep technical, as well as the professional and soft skills, needed for a successful career in this field.

In January 2019, the New Haven campus opened as a non-profit—since then, the innovative model and approach to education has made the program accessible to people from various backgrounds, including people who are choosing to attend Holberton right after high school in place of a more traditional higher education institution.  Here's what we are all about:

  • How we teach is different—At Holberton, students learn by doing, working hands-on with peers and the support from staff on projects. No classes, no lectures, which means students learn in a way that translates directly to what's expected in the workplace in terms of picking up critical collaboration, communication, and problem solving skills.
  • Our admissions process is blind—The school does not consider prior experience or accomplishments, this information isn't even collected. Instead, applicants complete a series of challenges and learn the basics of coding as part of the application, allowing them to determine if this is the right program for them, and if they are motivated to jump into this field in the first place. Aside from passing the application, applicants need a high school diploma or equivalent and be 18 when they start the program.
  • We don't charge upfront tuition—Students don't pay upfront for the program, and there's no cost to apply or attend. Once students leave the program and secure employment, they begin paying a percentage of their income for a short, set period of time (17% for 3.5 years).

This video will give you a bit more insight into what the program is about, including from the students' perspective, and here's a link to a virtual campus tour. You can request the syllabus and program information by following this link.

Nadine Krause
Director at Holberton
(203) 653-9134

WEBSITE

M&J Bus Inc logo

M & J Bus, Inc. is a family-owned and operated school bus transportation business based in Old Saybrook, CT. M & J presently serves 24 school districts throughout Connecticut, with over 600 vehicles on the road each day. M & J is known for its commitment to safety and customer service, as well as being a company where its employees are appreciated and love to work.

www.mjbusinc.com

CONTACT
Jon Hipsher
Chief Operating Officer
(860) 250-0870

Children in STEM program

The YMCA is in every Connecticut community. We have 21 Y’s; 36 Branches and over 176 Program Sites in Connecticut.

As a leading nonprofit, we are committed to meeting the needs of our families while nurturing the potential of every child and teen by supporting their social-emotional, cognitive and physical development from birth to career. With over 128,000 children (in 2018) experiencing Y values-based programming, we know, where and how children spend their time, is vital to their growth and future success in life.

Learn more about how Connecticut YMCAs Help All Kids Reach Their Potential, and learn more about Connecticut YMCA Before and After School Programs!

Dave Hayward
Connecticut and Rhode Island YMCA State Alliances
56 Chittenden Field Lane
Madison, CT 06443
dave.hayward@yalliance.org
312.835.2225

Audio Enhancement logo

Audio Enhancement, Inc. began 40 years ago when a mother wanted to create equal learning opportunities for her hearing-impaired sons and all students in the classroom. Today, we continue her mission by creating innovative technology that promotes more effective classrooms. Audio Enhancement’s classroom solutions include a Classroom Audio System, SAFE System, classroom cameras, and Intercom, Paging, and Bells. Through these solutions, Audio Enhancement promotes student success, increases teacher development, and improves administrative efficiency.

www.AudioEnhancement.com

Contact
Jeff Anderson
President/CEO
(800) 383-9362

Help spread the word to high school administrators and teachers in your districts: The Connecticut Bar Foundation organizes an annual high school essay contest on timely issue in the law. The contest is open to high school students throughout Connecticut. The finalists and their teachers are recognized at a ceremony at the Connecticut Supreme Court in May and are awarded cash prizes. The essay topic for 2019-2020 is titled “Immigration Situation.”

To find out more visit https://www.ctbarfdn.org/essaycontest.

Entries are due by February 21, 2020.

PK3-Banner20

As a result of receiving PDG grant funding from the Office of Early Childhood, we are offering a $2500 financial incentive to all accepted participants to the PK3 Leadership Program.

Creating coherent, integrated systems from PK to grade 3 have shown learning gaps can be reduced, achievement and opportunities for success enhanced. We’ve created an executive style program to help you bring new skills and leadership to your school, district, and community.

Click here to learn more

The many roles school social workers perform in public schools.

To CT Public School Superintendents:

As you develop your staffing plans for the 2020-2021 school year, we encourage you to take into consideration the important services that school social workers provide to students, teachers, staff and parents. School social workers are the link between home, school, and community. As members of the educational team comprised of teachers, administrators, pupil services staff, and parents, school social workers promote and support students academic and social success by providing specialized services that include, but not limited to:

  • Individual and group counseling
  • Support groups for students and parents
  • Crisis prevention and intervention
  • Monitoring outcomes of interventions
  • Home visits
  • Addressing and preventing absenteeism
  • Social-developmental assessments
  • Parent education and training
  • Professional case management
  • Information and referral
  • Collaboration with other pupil services professionals
  • Collaboration with community agencies and organizations
  • Advocacy for students, parents, and the school system
  • Administration and supervision of pupil services programs
  • Coordination of programs such as peer support and mentoring
  • Staff development and consultation
  • Policy development, such as discipline and attendance policies

The National Association of Social Workers recommends a ratio of one school social worker to two hundred and fifty students.

For more information on school social work contact the CT Alliance of School Social Workers at info.naswct@socialworkers.org

DATTCO logo

Established in 1924, DATTCO, Inc. is a third-generation family-owned business headquartered in New Britain, Connecticut. The School Bus Division serves New England school systems utilizing approximately 1,300 buses and transporting over 110,000 students. We have an excellent safety record built on a quality driver­ training program and school-based safety training for students. Our state-of-the­ art routing services provide opportunities to develop efficient routes to maximize savings. The Motor Coach Division, with 200 vehicles, specializes in providing personal and group travel services. In addition, DATTCO is New England's top bus dealer and leader in vehicle service including fleet and collision repair services.

www.dattco.com

Contact

Cliff Gibson
Chief Operating Officer
860-229-4878 Ext. 4613

IXL logo

IXL's K-12 personalized learning platform is used by more than 8 million students. Our comprehensive, Connecticut State Standards-aligned curriculum adapts to each student and provides specific guidance that targets their learning needs. With the Continuous Diagnostic and IXL Analytics, teachers have the insights they need to improve student performance in the classroom and on high-stakes assessments.

www.ixl.com

Contact
Brad Onken
Connecticut Educational Consultant
(781) 777-3517

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt logo
Jordan Friedman, Shaped Staff 

This blog post originally appeared on HMH’s Shaped blog on October 30, 2019. 

There's no denying that the prevalence of digital technology has impacted student learning across disciplines, including reading intervention. What was once initially taught primarily in print has evolved to enable teachers to analyze real-time data to direct learning, better understand striving students' needs and growth, and engage this population of learners.

In honor of the 10th anniversary of System 44, HMH's foundational reading intervention program for Grades 3–12, I chatted with Jay Hillman, Director of Educational Services at the Elmira City School District in Elmira, New York, and he help gathered responses to our questions from teachers who work with him. Below, you can find their combined insights into how reading intervention has evolved in the past two decades as well as advice to maximize student outcomes, ensure a growth mindset, and more. (Responses have been edited for length and clarity.)

Read the complete blog

Right At School logo

CAPSS is proud to welcome Right At School for a second year as an Elite sponsor of our association!

Right At School provides safe, engaging, and meaningful before and after school programs to inspire a love of learning, support schools, and give parents peace of mind.

Right At School was founded in 2011 by Dr. Mark Rothschild. He noticed that in many communities, before school and after school care looked more like babysitting than a fun and enriching time for students.  How much more could children grow and explore when supported with high-quality out of school programs?

Eight years later, Right At School is the official after school provider of the AASA. Its highly trained local educators ignite after school joy and community for 35,000 students in over 400 schools across the country all at no cost to districts. Parents love its affordable, flexible options and kids have a blast with its hands-on and fun Disguised LearningTM curriculum.

To learn more about the impact of a world-class after school program, contact Erreick Stewart, Director of School Partnerships, at erreick.stewart@rightatschool.com.

CAPSS is proud to welcome Right At School for a second year as an Elite sponsor of our association!

Right At School provides safe, engaging, and meaningful before and after school programs to inspire a love of learning, support schools, and give parents peace of mind.

Right At School was founded in 2011 by Dr. Mark Rothschild. He noticed that in many communities, before school and after school care looked more like babysitting than a fun and enriching time for students.  How much more could children grow and explore when supported with high-quality out of school programs?

Eight years later, Right At School is the official after school provider of the AASA. Its highly trained local educators ignite after school joy and community for 35,000 students in over 400 schools across the country all at no cost to districts. Parents love its affordable, flexible options and kids have a blast with its hands-on and fun Disguised LearningTM curriculum.

Right At School logo

You can visit Right At School at Booth #12 at the 2019 CABE/CAPSS Convention! Or, contact Erreick Stewart, Director of School Partnerships, at erreick.stewart@rightatschool.com to learn more about the impact of a world-class after school program.

 

December 11, 2019  |  1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Legislative Office Building, Room 1C

300 Capitol Avenue
Hartford, CT 06106

Please join Chris Smith of Rome, Smith and Lutz, who will provide an informational presentation about how a bill becomes a law and how superintendents can positively impact legislation through their advocacy. State Senator Douglas McCrory is scheduled to join us for a portion of this session.

Information/Registration

 

Logo for Shipman & Goodwin LLP, Counselors at Law

Shipman & Goodwin LLP has more than 170 attorneys with five offices in Connecticut, an office in New York and Washington, D.C. The firm is recognized nationally for the depth and breadth of our education practice. Our school law attorneys represent over 125 public school districts and educational entities. Our online resource, www.ctschoollaw.com is dedicated to presenting the latest developments in school law.

www.shipmangoodwin.com

Contact:
Thomas B. Mooney, Esq.
Partner

More about CAPSS' Business Partner Program

CAPSS CSDE and CABE logos

Joint Statement from Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona, CAPSS Executive Director Fran Rabinowitz and CABE Executive Director Bob Rader on Addressing Issues of Intolerance

In light of several recent high profile acts of racism involving students in our Connecticut schools, we want to take this opportunity to state unequivocally that all children deserve to be educated in a safe environment where they do not feel threatened regardless of their race, gender, gender identity or expression, religion, nationality, status of citizenship, or sexual orientation.  It is our core responsibility as educators to do everything we can to foster environments that ensure equity, diversity and inclusion.  In fact, the diversity in our state is one of our greatest strengths.  Research indicates that when our students are introduced to diversity at a young age, implicit biases are not only reduced, but we see stronger social skills and respect on all levels.

Together, the CT State Department of Education (CSDE), the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) and the Connecticut Association of Boards of Education (CABE) share a sense of urgency to proactively address issues of intolerance.  This is our priority.  We plan to work together to ensure districts are supported and have the necessary tools needed to promote environments safe from bias.  Preparing students to become productive members of society includes teaching about respecting diversity and creating a sense of community.

Below are links to resources for districts to consider as they continue this work.  However, links alone will not accomplish the important work ahead.  Many districts are already paving the way and we will be reaching out to them to share “evolving practices.”  In addition, leaders from CSDE, CAPSS and CABE will be meeting together soon to identify steps we plan to take in collaboration to provide resources, guidance, and technical assistance for districts.  

Together, as leaders, let’s embrace this opportunity to create learning environments where all students feel valued, respected, and safe to learn and grow.

Miguel A. Cardona, Ed.D.
Commissioner of Education

Frances M. Rabinowitz
Executive Director, CAPSS

Robert Rader
Executive Director, CABE


RESOURCES

“Avoiding Racial Equity Detours” - Paul Gorski, EdChange

 “The Critical Work of Racial Identity Development” - Dr. Daren Graves presentation to CSDE

State Education Resource Center’s (SERC) “Equity in Education: A Transformational Approach to Teaching and Learning”

The National Education Association’s (NEA) online resources for teachers, students and parents to help engage in a dialogue about racism, hate and violence

CT Alliance of YMCAs logo

The Connecticut Alliance of YMCAs is comprised of 21 YMCAs, each volunteer led, a charitable organization and a powerful advocate for the needs of children, families and individuals in communities throughout Connecticut. We have provided over $11 million dollars in Financial Assistance to support youth, adults and families who choose to participate in YMCA programs, regardless of their age, gender, income or background, ensuring that everyone has the opportunity to participate in a program which promotes youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. In 2018 YMCAs supported 14,910 children through after school/enrichment programs, 128,920 youth experienced values based programs at YMCAs in Connecticut. Also 4,967 children enrolled in the Y's preschool enrichment programs.

The YMCA is dedicated to nurturing the potential of every child and teen in our communities.

www.ymca.net

David Hayward
Strategic Consultant
Connecticut Alliance of YMCAs
(312) 835-2225

 

CT Alliance of YMCAs logo

The Connecticut Alliance of YMCAs is comprised of 21 YMCAs, each volunteer led, a charitable organization and a powerful advocate for the needs of children, families and individuals in communities throughout Connecticut. We have provided over $11 million dollars in Financial Assistance to support youth, adults and families who choose to participate in YMCA programs, regardless of their age, gender, income or background, ensuring that everyone has the opportunity to participate in a program which promotes youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. In 2018 YMCAs supported 14,910 children through after school/enrichment programs, 128,920 youth experienced values based programs at YMCAs in Connecticut. Also 4,967 children enrolled in the Y's preschool enrichment programs.

The YMCA is dedicated to nurturing the potential of every child and teen in our communities.

www.ymca.net

David Hayward
Strategic Consultant
Connecticut Alliance of YMCAs
(312) 835-2225

 

Anthony Colannino, ICLE Senior Fellow
This blog post originally appeared on HMH’s Shaped blog on August 26, 2019.

A strong instructional coach is like manna from heaven. Until I had one, I didn’t realize the impact such a person could have on my teachers, my building, and me. This not to say that working with instructional coaches is not without its challenges. It most certainly is filled with potential potholes. But if you—as an education leader—follow some of the steps below, you’re more likely to have happy, productive, and innovative teachers, which will lead to more children learning.

Get on the Same Page
This is not as easy as it sounds. District leadership and initiatives bind most instructional coaches, who also have to serve a school or schools with distinct needs based on culture, staff, and students. This can put coaches in the middle of two masters to serve. Discussing and deciding the most important curriculum, initiatives, or professional development will give your coach a clear plan to best implement central office priorities and meet your unique school’s needs.

Read the complete post

New Resource Highlights and Provides Promising Practices, Proven Models by Districts for Districts

(Hartford, CT) - The Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE) today launched its new Learn Together, Grow Together CT initiative, which will highlight districts addressing common issues and problems through innovative approaches, ideas and strategies that are producing successful outcomes. Learn Together, Grow Together CT will also promote these promising practices in district profiles inventoried on the CSDE website so that other district leaders and educators can connect with fellow districts and borrow, adapt and put to use these proven models in their own districts and schools. The initiative is part of Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona’s major points of focus to leverage the collective capacity and resources already in place around the state in order to better facilitate collaboration around common goals.
 
“Across the state districts large and small are dealing many of the same issues and challenges that have already been successfully overcome in another Connecticut district. A priority of CSDE is to focus on and share strategies that we know are working. If we can learn from each other and grow together, then we can leverage our collective capacity statewide to address some of the most prevalent hurdles facing us as educators,” said Commissioner Cardona. “This initiative supports our efforts to do a better job of creating lines of communication and sharing best practices to accelerate the most important aspect of everything we do: improving achievement, closing gaps and preparing all of our students for bright and promising futures.”
 
Learn Together, Grow Together CT consists of a social media campaign and dedicated page on CSDE’s website with an inventory of district profiles on promising practices they have implemented as well as the results that have been yielded. Learn Together, Grow Together CTwill identify and promote the most exceptional strategies and encourage districts to connect with their counterparts around the state to learn what impact these approaches are having on the success of students, educators and district operations. Districts can share with CSDE their own promising practices to be highlighted by following CSDE on Facebook and Twitter then tagging @ctdepartmentofeducation in posts and Tweeting at @EducateCT. Posts and Tweets should include the hashtag #LearnGrowCT.
 
The first installment of Learn Together, Grow Together CT will feature with two topic areas: Chronic Absenteeism and Student Attendance; and, College and Career Readiness (“CCR 2.0”). Those profiles include:

  • Thomaston - District Attendance Review Board (DARB): Four years ago, Thomaston implemented its DARB as part of a tiered attendance protocol to address chronic absenteeism and improve student attendance. The DARB’s members – which include at least one administrator, social worker/guidance counselor from each building, nurse and representatives from community agencies – attempt to build positive relationships with and become a partner to students and families who are or are on track to becoming chronically absent or truant. The DARB provides an alternative option that has led to a decrease in chronic absenteeism through improved family engagement and communication with parents/guardians.   
  • Bristol, Enfield and Middletown - College and Career Readiness (CCR): these districts’ practices around CCR are being highlighted for their improvements over the past several years, especially among students from low-income families. These districts are supporting innovative approaches by their educators including:
    • broadening the criteria for recommending students for rigorous courses like Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), or dual enrollment;
    • modifying school schedules to allow for deeper and flexible learning options;
    • providing dedicated career counseling services; and
    • making continuous improvements to their partnerships with colleges and employers.
  • Bristol is articulating more of its courses with the UCONN Early College Experience (ECE) program and offering Career and Technical Education (CTE) pathway courses through Tunxis Community College.
  • Enfield has a strong partnership with Asnuntuck Community College to offer programs in advanced manufacturing. They also collaborate with employers including 3M, Bushnell, VOYA, Real Art Ways, and NBC around job shadowing, skill development, and field trip opportunities.
  • Middletown is significantly increasing access to AP and ECE courses by broadening the criteria for selecting students. Teachers and staff are asked to consider not only academic readiness, but also other factors like grit and perseverance.

These districts’ strategies, as well as those happening in districts across the state, have propelled Connecticut to become the state with the third highest growth among students eligible for free-or-reduced price meals with respect to participation in the College Board’s Advanced Placement (AP) program. AP participation among those students has increased by 64 percent from 3,372 students in 2015 to 5,533 students in 2019.  To support this trend, the CSDE will continue to pay the remainder of fees not covered by the College Board for low-income students to take AP exams; a similar approach is being considered for the IB program as well.
 
A vital component for the success of any district innovation is the commitment of the respective local board of education to provide the supports necessary so all students can achieve to their fullest potential. For more detailed insights into these promising practices, please visit Learn Together, Grow Together CT.

Peter A. Yazbak
Director of Communications
Connecticut State Department of Education
O: 860-713-6528
M: 860-471-3518

About Sustainable CT

Sustainable CT is a voluntary certification program to recognize thriving and resilient Connecticut municipalities. Sustainable CT provides a wide-ranging menu of coordinated, voluntary actions that municipalities can complete to become more sustainable. Municipalities choose Sustainable CT actions, implement them, and earn points toward certification. SustainableCT.org for more.

Starting in September of 2019 Sustainable CT will expand its work to include supporting public schools, nonprofits, community groups and residents through its Community Match Fund. This is an innovative program that provides a flexible funding mechanism that will support sustainability-related projects throughout Connecticut.

We are excited to engage and support students in implementing projects in their communities!

Read more

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt logo
Matthew R. Larson, Ph.D.
Past President, NCTM; Senior Fellow, Math Solution
 
This blog post originally appeared on HMH’s Shaped blog on August 20, 2018.

Many of us, when we think of addressing equitable student outcomes in mathematics education, think of advocating for each and every student to have access to a rigorous and coherent curriculum. And this does remain a significant concern in the U.S.

Research indicates that students from marginalized groups continue to have less access to college preparatory pathways in math than non-marginalized students. Our work to ensure that all students have access to a meaningful math curriculum that supports both their professional and personal aspirations remains a critical component of our equity work. But, if we are truly committed to equitable learning outcomes in mathematics education, we must do more than just provide access.
Below are three other important aspects we must keep in mind in our efforts to better math education.

1. Fostering Positive Math Experiences and Identities
It is not enough to simply get students into the mathematics “pipeline.” We must also attend to how students experience math once they are in the “pipeline” because it is their dissatisfying experiences in the classroom that cause some students to shy away from math as a subject. Simply put, equitable math instruction must provide access and empower students to see themselves as capable learners, users, and doers of mathematics. 

How students see themselves and how they believe others see them as learners of mathematics greatly impacts their success. By implementing research-informed and equitable instructional practices, teachers can significantly enhance the experiences and learning outcomes of students in the math classroom.

Read the full article

Too often we hear about Board of Education members and Superintendents in serious conflict. Sadly, such has been the case over the last few weeks in two of Connecticut’s largest school districts. Do we all understand the serious detrimental impact this has on the very students these systems serve? Are we aware of how this deepens the pervasive achievement gap? As we celebrate the birth of our country, let’s remember that our country is built on a sound education experience for every child. Surely, if the adults responsible for the children in their care continue to engage in public conflict, they deny students their inalienable right to learn in a school community with dignity and respect...

Read the entire op-ed

 

This law allows local Boards of Education to set a firm graduation date no earlier than the 180th day of the board-adopted school calendar for that year. This means that should school be canceled due to inclement weather or for other reasons, local Boards are not required to change the graduation date even though seniors will graduate attending less than 180 school days...

For more information please contact:
Dr. Scott V. Nicol
Superintendent of Schools

Press Release

Overview of the Opportunity

A new RFP invites applications for New England communities to develop a collective vision of their graduates, a first step for designing schools with students at the center.

The Barr Foundation seeks to select up to 20 communities across New England to receive funding and technical assistance to build locally-driven portraits of their high school graduates. A portrait of a graduate articulates the community’s collective vision of what all high school students will know and be able to do. In order for all students to reach their potential, high schools must be intentionally designed to hold students to high expectations. Through the development and use of a portrait of a graduate, high schools can embrace a robust definition of student success that ensures that students are fully equipped with core academic knowledge and skills, as well as a range of other competencies that we all need to be successful in college, career, and community...

Barr Foundation Website

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt logo

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt is a global learning company dedicated to changing people's lives by fostering passionate, curious learners. As a leading provider of pre-K-12 education content, services and cutting-edge technology solutions, HMH is uniquely positioned to create engaging and effective experiences from early childhood to beyond the classroom.

https://www.hmhco.com/

Massimo Rubini
Director of Sales
NYS   CT   RI
(845) 745-6944

College Board logo

The College Board is a mission-driven not-for-profit organization that connects students to college success and opportunity.

Founded in 1900, the College Board was created to expand access to higher education. Today, the membership association is made up of over 6,000 of the world's leading educational institutions and is dedicated to promoting excellence and equity in education.

www.collegeboard.org

Contact
Alan Bernstein
Senior Director
(781) 663-2736

The University of New Haven is proud to offer a series of four graduate courses specifically designed for individuals interested in obtaining certification as a public school business official (SBO). These courses have been developed in consultation with the Connecticut Association of School Business Officials (CASBO) and include instruction in the areas of responsibility as outlined by the Connecticut State Department of Education.

The University will offer the following courses on Saturdays in Fall 2019 and Spring 2020:

Fall 2019:
School Business Administration
School Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining

Spring 2020:
School Finance I
School Finance II (Including Federal and State Grants)

The Connecticut State Department of Education recognizes the four courses as fulfilling educational requirements for certification in School Business Administration (O85), provided the applicant has met all other certification requirements.

For more information, please contact Dr. Christy Smith, Director of the MPA Program at the University of New Haven: CDSmith@newhaven.edu

CAPSS' logo

We are currently renewing membership for the 2019-2020 calendar year and have had questions from districts regarding eligibility. In addition to public school superintendents, our members include those in our Executive District Leaders' Roundtable. EDLR members are comprised of any central office administrator -- such as assistant superintendent, curriculum director, special education director, assessment coordinator, etc.

For more information on membership, please contact Dawn Cole (860-236-8640 ext. 100) or Dio Markopoulos (860-236-8640 ext. 130).

Dear School Board Member/Superintendent,
     
As many of you know, The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence has worked closely with CABE and CAPSS to build awareness of social-emotional learning and school leadership best practices. As part of this ongoing effort, we are pleased to invite you to participate in a School Board-Superintendent Survey powered by Yale. This survey asks questions regarding:
     

  • School climate and stress/burnout/mental health
  • Social-emotional learning (SEL) implementation
  • School Board and Superintendent leadership practices

     
All CT school board members/superintendents are invited to participate. This survey is voluntary and should take approximately 10 minutes to complete. Your responses will be kept completely anonymous. We are not collecting personally identifying information. We plan to communicate the results of this survey in summary form through CABE and CAPSS to superintendents and school board members statewide.
     
Please plan to complete the survey without interruption. To access the survey, click or copy and paste this URL into your internet browser:
    
    Superintendent Survey

    School Board Survey
    
We appreciate your help as we work to “Make CT the First Emotionally Intelligent State”. Please feel free to contact Dr. Marc Brackett or Scott Levy with any questions.
     
    With gratitude,


    Dr. Marc A. Brackett
    Director, The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence
    
    Scott R. Levy
    Executive Director, The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence
    
 

Partnering to Prevent School Violence is an FBI training event being held on July 16, 2019. 9:00 am -12 noon.  This training event is FREE.

The topics listed below will be taught by FBI Special Agents.

  • Behavioral Indicators of Violent Actors
  • Countering Violent Extremism in Schools
  • Crisis Management
  •  Viewing of the FBI Video: Echoes of Columbine

The following people would benefit from the training:

  • High School Superintendents, Principals, and Administrators
  • Threat Assessment Team Members for High Schools, Colleges and Universities
  • School Resource Officers - State and Local
  • College and University Campus Security / Law Enforcement
  •  High School Campus Security / Law Enforcement

This event will be very similar to the Countering Violent Extremism training events held last summer and on April 30th of this year at Yale West Campus.  If you attended one of those trainings, there is no need to attend again.
 
This training will be held at the Connecticut Police Academy auditorium, 285 Preston Ave, Meriden, CT 06450.

Register

CAPSS is committed to ongoing efforts to share ideas regarding current effective education practices in Connecticut and around the world with the membership. The Innovation Committee will offer a regular mini-column highlighting links to interesting articles and reviews, as well as podcasts related to expansive concepts of innovation in our work.

Although it has become cliché to proclaim the accelerating pace of change will transform every aspect of human existence –it doesn’t mean it is not true.

As leaders in our field, we are so often bogged down in negotiations, problem resolution and politics of all sorts that we often have little time to explore. Innovation Wave will offer thought-provoking links to ideas and practices both in education and from outside.

Innovation Wave will be linked to our website, but will also be pushed out to you via this small column in our Leader's Report.

Please send me news of activities in your district that you would be open to having colleagues visit. An aspect of our redesigning of the education experiences of our students is to redesign the partnerships among our group.

Check out these links:

NOVA: The Design Process: From Idea to Solution | PBS Learning Media

Fast Company

Stanford Innovation Lab with Tina Seelig | Apple Podcasts

There are two key underpinnings to Innovation Wave.

1.    No one is the expert on all things ‘innovative’.
2.    We need to share our successes, our failures to launch, and our works in progress.

We can do this! Other states are committed to adapting public education to the transformations underway. We cannot afford to be the ‘land of steady habits’.

The leadership network of CAPSS can be leaders of innovation.

CONTACT

Chris Clouet
Innovation Committee Chair

 

Dear Fellow Superintendents, 

I continue to serve on the Water Safety and Awareness Legislative Task Force which is sponsored by the Connecticut Commission on Women, Children, and Seniors (CWCS).  The purpose of this communication is to bring annual awareness to Superintendents on the seriousness of child drownings and to provide information and resources for Superintendents to disseminate.   

Please kindly forward this information (with attached links) to your School Principals, Curriculum Directors, Town Recreation Departments, Special Education Directors, Wellness Committees, Physical Education Teachers, Parents (through Principal/School Newsletters) and anyone else you deem appropriate in your district/town.  

CHALLENGE:  Approximately 800 children die yearly from unintentional drowning in the United States. Sixty-two children from birth to age 19 drowned in Connecticut from 2004-2014.  All children are susceptible to drownings, but a disproportionately higher number of minority children (2/3 of children who drown are African American or Hispanic) and children on the autism spectrum (90% of autistic child deaths are due to drowning) are represented in those numbers. Water safety awareness instruction could reduce those rates. 

SOLUTIONS:  Provide water safety information to adults and students during the month of May (National Water Safety Month).   The task force kindly requests that Superintendents forward this email and resources below to appropriate school and town leaders in hopes that the short video link (#1 below) could be used in at least a portion of one class session for all students and could also be included in the Principal’s newsletter for parents to view.

Lastly, if your district has curriculum written in this area and has experienced a successful way to deliver this important information, please feel free to pass this on to me.  I will share it with the task force.

I thank you for your attention to this critical area for our students. 

Sincerely yours, 

Robert 'Bob' Gilbert
Superintendent of Schools
Woodbridge School District
Woodbridge, CT 06525
203-387-6631

RESOURCES

CT Children's Hospital Injury Prevention Center (video)

Main link to the Pool Safely national public education campaign

Pool Safely also has videos, other general resources, and free print materials that can be ordered for events. 

CWCS website for more information on the activities of the Connecticut Commission on Women, Children and Seniors (CWCS)

I wanted to reach out to you personally to share what looks like an exceptional opportunity. It’s a   one-of-a kind summit for women superintendents July 21–24 in Austin, TX. It's called Educator Power Trip: A Well-Being and Leadership Summit for Women Superintendents. The entire venue, Lake Austin Spa Resort, has been secured for this event

You may already have been sent an invitation via email, but we all know how things get lost in the deluge of incoming mail, blocked by a web filter, or fall into spam.
 
The event, for just 30 attendees, is organized by an advisory board of women leaders in education and stakeholders in national education organizations.
 
We can all use a little work-life balance, and this summit will be a unique way for women district leaders to explore and practice wellness as an integral part of their personal effectiveness in driving change.
 
Take a look at the website below. You’ll find complete details as well as a convenient way to register.

Information/Registration

Please join us for  our final session of the 2018 – 2019 Women in the District Office series on May 9, 2019. Our session, Resiliency and the Sisterhood, will identify the resources and privileges we have that help us to thrive in our roles as leaders. Further, we can explore how to work together and share those resources in support of other women in our professional lives. Let’s challenge ourselves and each other to consider how we can overcome barriers that may prevent us from developing a shared sisterhood with other women in educational leadership who are different from us (race, ethnicity, sexual identity, class, etc.).
 
The session will be held at Mercy by the Sea (167 Neck Road Madison, CT 06443) . Coffee and continental breakfast will be served at 8:30 am with the formal program from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm. Please use the following link to register for the session:

Registration

“A ball of crazy!” That’s how Aleigha Henderson-Rosser describes the technical issues around access to digital learning resources when she joined Atlanta Public Schools (APS) in 2010 as Executive Director of Instructional Technology. More than 53,000 students and 6,000 teachers didn’t have standardized login details. Precious instruction time was wasted dealing with forgotten passwords and usernames. And with no central place to access digital resources, teachers and students were in the dark about which tools were even available. It may have been the thick of the digital learning revolution in the U.S., but students in Atlanta Public Schools were not reaping the benefits.

Read the complete article on EdSurge

ClassLink.com

A District Administration Web Seminar

Wednesday, April 24, 2019  •  2:00 pm ET

As school districts increasingly deploy digital learning tools and resources, complications and problems arise, such as password fatigue and lost instructional time due to troubleshooting and security issues.

Attend this web seminar with the CTOs of Franklin Pierce Schools in Tacoma, Washington and La Cañada Unified School District in California, and learn how establishing a robust single sign-on, analytics, and rostering platform can result in a more secure and efficient learning environment.

Topics will include:

  • Leveraging single sign-on to organize and manage instructional resources
  • Enhancing access management and authenticating user identities
  • Verifying and tracking usage of digital learning tools and resources
  • Reducing IT costs and minimizing the need for technical support

Sponsored by ClassLink

Register
 

Our national organization, AASA, The School Superintendents Association, just launched its decennial superintendent pipeline study, an effort to detail the demographics, trends, and experiences of the nation’s public school superintendents. You should have received an invitation to the survey from them. In support of this important research and in case you did NOT receive the invitation to the survey, here is the link.

We encourage you to take the time to complete the survey. You can direct any questions to AASA policy analyst Chris Rogers.

TEACHER LEADERS AS ENABLERS OF CREATIVITY, COLLABORATION, AND INNOVATION IN THEIR CLASSROOMS AND BEYOND

Three Outstanding Keynotes—Andy Hargreaves (professional collaboration), Peter Gamwell (back by demand on creativity), and Marc Brackett (social/emotional learning).

Twenty-two (22) separate Breakout Sessions lead by Connecticut’s Teacher Leaders on many topics.

Early-bird registration extended to April 29, 2019.

Monday, May 20, 2019
8am - 4pm
Central Connecticut State University
Alumni Hall Student Center

Sponsored by CCSU in partnership with CEA, AFT-CT and Duke TeachHouse

More information

Registration

Research indicates that trauma can have a direct, immediate impact on students’ academic performance. CT has opportunities for schools and districts interested in assistance with the delivery of evidence-based treatment for students exposed to trauma. Gleaned from a large body of research pointing to the positive impact of trauma-informed educational settings, schools can embark on a whole-school paradigm shift to recognize, understand, and address the needs of students that have been exposed to trauma and chronic stress. Schools and school-based health centers can learn how to deliver evidence-based treatment for children exposed to trauma. Moreover, these opportunities will positively impact school culture and have the potential to change the trajectory of vulnerable students.
 
Through funding from the Department of Children and Families, the Child Health and Development Institute (CHDI) and Dr. Sharon Hoover (CBITS Developer) is offering opportunities to implement Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS) and Bounce Back (a version of CBITS for elementary aged children in grades K through 5).  New teams will join an existing statewide network of 23 CBITS/BB provider teams, which together have served over 1,250 children with excellent outcomes. All training, ongoing consultation, and quality assurance is provided at no cost, and participating providers/schools are eligible to receive performance-based sustainability funding. 
 
I have attached a brochure with additional information regarding CBITS and Bounce Back. You can also contact me, Dr. Diana Perry, Project Coordinator for the CBITS Initiative. I would be happy to answer any questions or furnish a CBITS/Bounce Back Welcome Packet and Application. All prospective teams are offered pre-application consultation, as we believe that implementation support needs to be available every step of the way, and not just once a partnership is formed.    
 
Additionally, you can check out the attached brochure or use the following links to learn more about the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools and Bounce Back interventions:

CBITS & Bounce Back - Helping Children Through Schools

Bounce Back Program Overview

CONTACT
Diana L. Perry, PsyD
Project Coordinator
Child Health & Development Institute (CHDI)
270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 360
Farmington CT 06032
(p) 860.679.3327
(f) 860.679.0195
dperry@uchc.edu
www.chdi.edu

Brochure

Please join us on Thursday, May 16th from 10:00am to 12:00pm at CAPSS for the Retirement Workshop.
 
Bob Sudol will discuss the following topics:

  • Qualifying for Retirement
  • Retirement Plan Options
  • Purchasing Service
  • Social Security Post Retirement
  • Employment Filing for Retirement
  • Legislative Update/Changes
  • Opportunity for Q&A

REGISTER

Based on the work of HundrED, the CAPSS Innovation Committee invites every Connecticut school district to share their PK-12 innovative educational idea/practice; feel free to submit more than one! The goal is to help improve Connecticut education by contributing to a platform to share innovative school practices.

Thank you to the many districts who have already submitted their ideas, shown here.

Make sure your district is represented by uploading your innovative ideas!

Form for submittals

More information

Oak Hill School logo

Oak Hill School is a private, state approved, special education school serving students ages 3-21. Programming in our classrooms focuses on teaching academic, social and daily living skills with an ultimate goal of making our students more independent in life. Our mission is to empower students to learn through meaningful, functional, and innovative educational experiences. Our classrooms are located within community settings, including public school, to allow for maximum integration opportunities based on the age and needs of the students. Oak Hill, our parent organization, provides a full range of services to individuals with disabilities.

www.oakhillct.org

Contact:
Ana Wittig
Chief Administrator

Hello. This message is from the School Safety Program of the Connecticut Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security.

The State of Connecticut has received a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice called the STOP Violence Grant. The purpose of this grant is to bring proven violence reduction training to schools in Connecticut at no charge. We have partnered with Sandy Hook Promise to bring the training to the Connecticut schools. We are reaching out to you now to ask if you would like this training brought to your school.

I have attached flyers to better explain the training programs, but please feel free to contact me with any questions. The “Signs of Suicide” training will be delivered to school staff members, deemed appropriate by you, in a regional delivery. The “Say Hello” and “Say Something” trainings are for grades 6-12 and are delivered in an assembly type setting about 45 minutes to one hour in length. I will be providing the list of interested schools to Sandy Hook Promise so they can work with you on scheduling the trainings.

Sandy Hook Promise would like to start contacting schools and scheduling trainings soon to determine trainers required for CT in the next school year. For most schools, the trainings will begin in the fall 2019 and continue throughout the school year.

Please contact me ASAP if you want this training for your school and who will be the main contact person (include name, title, phone number and email address).

Thank you,

Bill Turley

Signs of Suicide

Say Something - Anonymous Reporting Brochure

Start with Hello - In-Person Training

Say Something - In-Person Training

ClassLink - Single Sign-On and Rostering

Thursday, March 28, 1:00 pm ET

See how single sign-on and class rostering has been transformed from a thankless job into a catalyst for meaningful use of digital learning resources.

Join this webinar to hear directly from Dwight Bard, Director of Technology at Greencastle-Antrim School District and Kristen Landis, PhD, Director of Technology at North Penn School District as they share:

  • Why school districts are moving away from in-house and/or inflexible systems to a customizable single sign-on option
  • How this change creates a fast, easy, and sustainable win for the CIO while meeting the needs of instruction along the way
  • Why factors such as security, flexibility, and expanding resource libraries are driving districts towards next-gen platforms
  • How individualized access is leading to organizational improvements in utilization
  • How analytics as a function of single sign-on and rostering is informing strategic level decisions

This webinar cites the experiences two district leaders have had in scaling up technologies that drive access. As a result, presenters will give a first-hand account of what it’s like to evaluate, implement, and manage a robust single sign-on, class-rostering, and analytics platform.

Register to attend this webinar today!

TEACHER LEADERS AS ENABLERS OF CREATIVITY, COLLABORATION, AND INNOVATION IN THEIR CLASSROOMS AND BEYOND

Three Outstanding Keynotes—Andy Hargreaves (professional collaboration), Peter Gamwell (back by demand on creativity), and Marc Brackett (social/emotional learning).

Twenty-two (22) separate Breakout Sessions lead by Connecticut’s Teacher Leaders on many topics.

Early-bird registration ends on April 15, 2019.

Monday, May 20, 2019
8am - 4pm
Central Connecticut State University
Alumni Hall Student Center

Sponsored by CCSU in partnership with CEA, AFT-CT and Duke TeachHouse

More information/registration

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Based on the work of HundrED, the CAPSS Innovation Committee invites every Connecticut school district to share their PK-12 innovative educational idea/practice; feel free to submit more than one! The goal is to help improve Connecticut education by contributing to a platform to share innovative school practices.

Thank you to the many districts who have already submitted their ideas, shown here.

Make sure your district is represented by uploading your innovative ideas!

Form for submittals

More information

Fairfield University logo

Candidates enrolled in Fairfield University’s online Dyslexia Interventionist Certificate program with Wilson Reading System® Level I certification acquire a sophisticated working knowledge of the sound-symbol system of English (phonology) and its structure (morphology), and learn how to implement the Wilson Reading System® for the purpose of remediating the word level (accuracy and fluency) reading and spelling deficits of students in Grades 3-12, including students diagnosed with language-based learning disabilities and dyslexia.

View/download for complete information

As New England's largest investor-owned utility, Aquarion has a special appreciation for the accomplishments of all of our state's environmental volunteers. Accordingly, we have designated one of the award categories to honor a student in grades 9-12 who has worked to protect or restore Connecticut's natural resources.

The student who wins the Aquarion Environmental Champion Award will receive statewide recognition and take home a $1,000 award. Teachers, administrators and clubs can also take part in the program and, if selected as an Environmental Champion, would win statewide honors and a $2,500 grant given in their name to a non-profit environmental organization of their choice.

The awards will be presented at a special celebration to be held on June 1, 2019 at Connecticut's Beardsley Zoo. U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal and other dignitaries will be in attendance to present the awards.

The deadline for nominations is May 1, 2019.

More information

Civility Lost book cover

Civility is a major issue in today's society. School leaders are confronted with this issue in leading and managing schools. Education has a significant role in creating and maintaining a more civil society upon which our nation depends in its governance and operation.
 
George Goen's new book, Civility Lost: The Media, Politics, and Education, speaks to the issue of civility so that a positive and constructive dialogue can take place. Education and leadership are important in establishing a society in which civil discourse on different issues can take place. A democracy will always have conflicting ideas and debate. The question is: how can we maintain our civility and find common ground and solutions?

Book Summary

Website/purchase
 

Candidates enrolled in Fairfield University’s online Dyslexia Interventionist Certificate program with Wilson Reading System® Level I certification acquire a sophisticated working knowledge of the sound-symbol system of English (phonology) and its structure (morphology), and learn how to implement the Wilson Reading System® for the purpose of remediating the word level (accuracy and fluency) reading and spelling deficits of students in Grades 3-12, including students diagnosed with language-based learning disabilities and dyslexia.

View/download for complete information

Oak Hill School is a private, state approved, special education school serving students ages 3-21. Programming in our classrooms focuses on teaching academic, social and daily living skills with an ultimate goal of making our students more independent in life. Our mission is to empower students to learn through meaningful, functional, and innovative educational experiences. Our classrooms are located within community settings, including public school, to allow for maximum integration opportunities based on the age and needs of the students. Oak Hill, our parent organization, provides a full range of services to individuals with disabilities.

www.oakhillct.org

Contact:
Ana Wittig
Chief Administrator

Leading for Equity event page banner graphic

Through the incredible generosity of The New England School Development Council, we're pleased to invite you to the Leading for Equity Institute for superintendents and their district teams on March 19, 2019 from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm. This session is open to all superintendents, including those who could not attend the fall institute. The morning session will be for superintendents and their district teams. Lunch and the afternoon session will be for superintendents only.

More information

REGISTER

Sponsored by:

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February 6, 2019


(HARTFORD, CT) – State Treasurer Shawn T. Wooden has launched the 2019 Dream Big! college-savings competition that will award up to $1,000 each to 48 students in grades K-8.

“Encouraging young Connecticut students to start thinking about and planning for college as early as possible is crucial to their future success,” said Wooden, who is Trustee of the Connecticut Higher Education Trust (CHET) - sponsor of the annual Dream Big! Competition. “And as the owner of CHET accounts for my two sons, I can’t think of a better way to get started than by taking part in this fun and thought-provoking competition.”

Four students will be awarded a grand prize of $1,000, while the others will be awarded $500. A total of $26,000 will be awarded statewide to 48 students in the form of a contribution to a new or existing CHET account.

The competition asks students to use a creative outlet, in the form of a drawing or essay, to answer the question: “What do you want to be when you grow up?” Kindergarten through third grade students are asked to share artwork depicting what they want to do after they go to college.

Fourth through eighth grade students are asked to answer in a 250-word essay how they will change the world after college.

Schools are also eligible for a prize. Eight schools - one per county - will be selected to receive up to $500 in cash for entries submitted on behalf of their students. To be eligible to win, the school must submit a minimum of 50 entries on behalf of entrants and have the highest number of entries in their county. School winners in the past have used the money to purchase library books, classroom materials and other items to enrich their students' academic experience.

Entries are judged based on theme, originality and creativity. Drawings will also be evaluated based on artistic design and attractiveness, while essays are also judged on overall grammar, spelling and punctuation. Printable entry forms, official rules and additional details can be found at www.CHETDreamBig.com. No purchase is necessary to enter or win.

The competition began on Friday, February 1, and entry deadline is Friday, March 29.

Download press release for complete information

ambyese logo

Does your student excel in science and/or possess an above average aptitude in math?

The AMBYESE program is in the process of launching a one of a kind Scientific Lab Symposium: 

When: Saturday, April 27, 2019

Where: UCONN-Stamford

Time: 10 AM – 3 PM

Objective of the symposium: To familiarize college-bound students (who possess above average aptitudes in science and mathematics) of the emerging careers in natural/life science available to them within the public and private sectors by electing to pursue an undergraduate degree in one of the following majors:

Astronomy, Biological Sciences, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Earth and Marine Science, Mathematics, Metallurgy, Environmental Science, Physics and Geography

Under the team leadership of Praxair's John Sirman, Ph.D., who was awarded his Ph.D. degree in Electronic Ceramic Materials, the symposium will present a series of cryo-demonstrations and other intriguing science displays in the auditorium of UCONN Stamford. Participating students will gain hands-on experience in the process and have the opportunity to network with scientists and science teachers/professionals through a panel discussion and informal discussions.

Download for complete information.

Ambyese.org

This is the seventh installment of the Connecticut High School Graduation Requirements Unpacked series. This seven-part series, created in collaboration with the Great Schools Partnership, unpacks the graduation requirements that were passed by the Connecticut General Assembly in 2017, provides resources for implementation, and questions for your considerations as you and your community work toward full implementation for the class of 2023. 

This week’s topic is Community Engagement + Communications.

View/download this brief.

CASBO logo

CASBO is dedicated to acknowledging exemplary business managers and their service to the betterment of education for the students of Connecticut.  CASBO has three recognition awards—Connecticut Celebrated School Business Official Award, Rising Star Award and Innovative Practices Award.  Annually, nominations are sought in February through March.  The Selection Committee is comprised of CASBO members, a CABE representative, and a CAPSS representative. 

The Connecticut Celebrated School Business Official and Rising Star Awards were created to acknowledge the value and contributions of outstanding school business officials. Nominees are evaluated based upon their contributions to their profession, regardless of the size of their districts and their job titles. These awards are meant to honor an individual both for current accomplishments and sustained contributions.   The Rising Star Award is reserved for those who have had their certification for 10 or less years.

The purpose of the School Business and Operations Innovative Practices Recognition is to identify effective and innovative uses of public resources in support of education, and to disseminate the ideas or practices for the benefit of public schools in Connecticut.

Each award winner receives a beautiful award presented at the President’s Dinner, complimentary Institute registration and tickets to the President’s Dinner.  The call for award nominations will be accepted until March 29, 2019 via the CASBO website.

Armed School Security Training Pursuant to PA 13-188

The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection’s, Police Officer Standards and Training Council, Field Services Training Division, is presenting the training of armed school security personnel as required by Public Act 13-188.

The training session will be a ONE day, 6 contact hour session and has been scheduled on Wednesday, August 7, 2019 and for NEW HIRES in addition to day one would have to attend Thursday, August 8, 2019 at the Connecticut Police Academy in Meriden, CT from 8:30AM-4:00 PM.

This seminar is required under Public Act 13-188.  This Act requires that armed security personnel in a public school, other than a sworn member of an organized local police department, be a qualified, retired in good standing, law enforcement officer certified by the Police Officer Standards and Training Council, or the Division of State Police within the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection.  Such personnel will receive annual training.

Complete information and registration

abstract image of hand holding lights

Based on the work of HundrED, the CAPSS Innovation Committee invites every Connecticut school district to share one PK-12 innovative educational idea/practice. The goal is to help improve Connecticut education by establishing a platform to share innovative school practices. Thank you to the many districts who have already submitted their ideas. Make sure your district is represented by uploading your innovative idea!

More information/link to form

abstract image of hand holding lights

Based on the work of HundrED, the CAPSS Innovation Committee invites every Connecticut school district to share one PK-12 innovative educational idea/practice. The goal is to help improve Connecticut education by establishing a platform to share innovative school practices. Thank you to the many districts who have already submitted their ideas. Make sure your district is represented by uploading your innovative idea!

More information/link to form

2019 Prirority Recommendations page banner

The Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) advances its priorities for the 2019 legislative session in accordance with our mission to lead the continuous improvement of public education for all students by advocating public policy for children and by developing and supporting executive school leaders.

Priority recommendations include:

  • Education Funding
  • School/Student Safety and Well-Being
  • Efforts to Promote Regionalism
  • Mandates

View/download the complete report.

This is the sixth installment of the Connecticut High School Graduation Requirements Unpacked series. This seven-part series, created in collaboration with the Great Schools Partnership, unpacks the graduation requirements that were passed by the Connecticut General Assembly in 2017, provides resources for implementation, and questions for your considerations as you and your community work toward full implementation for the class of 2023.

This week’s topic is District Policy.

View/download this brief.

Kids Speak Junior post banner

The State of Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, The Office of the Attorney General, The University of Connecticut, The New Haven, CT Chapter of Links, Inc., the Tau Xi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Girlfriends, Inc., Chums, Inc. and additional organizations are co-sponsoring CT Kids Speak Jr. Connecticut Kids Speak Jr.  is the kickoff to the Kids Court Jr. Essay Competition.  The Kids Court Jr. Competition provides elementary school students who are in 3-5 grade an opportunity to research a specific civil or human rights issue and advocate a position, initially in an essay and picture and then orally before a panel of judges.
 
Kids Speak Jr.  is a half-day program of interactive exercises, peer debate, improvisations, an interactive panel discussion and peer dialogue aimed at raising student’s consciousness about civil and human rights issues and reducing bullying and prejudice.  Students from across the State of Connecticut are invited to participate in this groundbreaking event.  In this inaugural year there are two topics for Kids Speak Jr.  and the Kids Court Jr.  Essay Competition.  The Kids Speak will be held on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 from 9:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m.  at the state Armory in Hartford, Connecticut.  The event will be held at the University of Connecticut School of Law in Hartford.  A morning snack and lunch will be served at no cost to participants.  Please see the attached flyer for more information.  
 
Kids Speak Jr. is patterned after a twenty-five year program (Kids Speak) that has had participation from over 20,000 students state and tri-state.  Tens of Thousands of students have participated in Kids Speak and Kids Court over the years and the program has been very favorably received by educators and administrators.  Past Speakers have included Governor Dannel P. Malloy, State Senators, a Supreme Court Justice, State Representatives, Representatives from the Mayor’s Office In Hartford, The Commissioner of Education and many more dignitaries.  We hope that you will join us.  ADMISSION IS FREE AND LUNCH WILL BE SERVED FREE of CHARGE.  SPACES ARE LIMITED.  There are a limited number of transportation scholarships available.
 
Media will be present this year.  Thus, please register early before the spots are taken. The deadline for registering is March 7, 2019.  Please register for Kids Speak Jr. at Cheryl.Sharp@ct.gov 
 
Please have your students begin working on their essays now.  The topics for this year’s Competition are in the attached flyer.  The final Competition will be held at the end of April.    We hope to see you and your students.
  
Attorney Cheryl A. Sharp, Deputy Director
CT Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities
450 Columbus Blvd Ste 2
Hartford CT 06103
 
Tel:   (860) 541-3450
Fax:  (860) 246-5265
Web:  www.ct.gov/chro

View/download our brochure.
 

2019 Prirority Recommendations page banner

The Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) advances its priorities for the 2019 legislative session in accordance with our mission to lead the continuous improvement of public education for all students by advocating public policy for children and by developing and supporting executive school leaders.

Priority recommendations include:

  • Education Funding
  • School/Student Safety and Well-Being
  • Efforts to Promote Regionalism
  • Mandates

View/download the complete report.

2019 Prirority Recommendations page banner

The Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) advances its priorities for the 2019 legislative session in accordance with our mission to lead the continuous improvement of public education for all students by advocating public policy for children and by developing and supporting executive school leaders.

Priority recommendations include:

  • Education Funding
  • School/Student Safety and Well-Being
  • Efforts to Promote Regionalism
  • Mandates

View/download the complete report.

Teacher reading to students in classroom

This is the first doctoral program the Farrington College of Education offers, and it's the first of its kind in the state. The degree is targeted to working and licensed educational leaders such as principals, superintendents, curriculum leaders and special education directors and is also seeking candidates who have informal leadership roles such as department chairs and instructional coaches. The program will prepare doctoral candidates to lead school communities from a whole-child perspective. It will be will be directed by David G. Title, clinical assistant professor, former superintendent of schools of the Bloomfield and Fairfield school systems and the 2010 Superintendent of the Year in Connecticut. The program will include classes, doctoral seminars and a capstone dissertation, to be completed in three years.

Read the complete article.

ClassLink Webinar 2-6-19 graphic

New England Districts Present: Eliminating Barriers to Access in K-12, Lessons learned about managing digital resources with single sign-on, analytics, rostering, and account provisioning tools.

Wednesday, February 6, 1:00 pm ET

As schools continue to increase the amount of digital learning tools and resources available within the district, new complications and barriers arise for students and administrators:

  • How do we effectively manage and organize all of these resources?
  • Are we losing valuable instructional time in the classroom due to troubleshooting accessibility and security issues?
  • Are students and teachers even using these products? Which ones are being utilized the most? Which ones aren’t?
  • How can automated account provisioning save time and money?

Catherine Orgovan, Enterprise Software Systems Manager at Norwalk Public Schools (CT) and Michael Skott, Technology Director, at Middletown City School District (CT) will share how leveraging single sign-on and analytics platforms help remove barriers to access and how you can do it too.

Register to attend this webinar today!

This is the fifth installment of the Connecticut High School Graduation Requirements Unpacked series. This seven-part series, created in collaboration with the Great Schools Partnership, unpacks the graduation requirements that were passed by the Connecticut General Assembly in 2017, provides resources for implementation, and questions for your considerations as you and your community work toward full implementation for the class of 2023. 

This week’s topic is the Mastery-Based Diploma Assessment.

View/download this brief.

This is the fourth installment of the Connecticut High School Graduation Requirements Unpacked series. This seven-part series, created in collaboration with the Great Schools Partnership, unpacks the graduation requirements that were passed by the Connecticut General Assembly in 2017, provides resources for implementation, and questions for your considerations as you and your community work toward full implementation for the class of 2023. 

This week’s topic is Mastery-Based Learning.

View/download this brief.
 

Here is another exciting way for districts to participate in the March 8 Igniting Innovation conference.  Based on the work of HundrED, the CAPSS Innovation Committee is pleased to invite every Connecticut school district to share one PK-12 innovative educational idea/practice. The goal is to help improve Connecticut education by establishing a platform to share innovative school practices. We hope that every district will participate!

More information

Here is another exciting way for districts to participate in the March 8 Igniting Innovation conference.  Based on the work of HundrED, the CAPSS Innovation Committee is pleased to invite every Connecticut school district to share one PK-12 innovative educational idea/practice. The goal is to help improve Connecticut education by establishing a platform to share innovative school practices. We hope that every district will participate!

More information

The CAPSS' Innovation Committee is an evolving network of superintendents (Bethel, Bloomfield, Bolton, Branford, CREC, CCSU Teacher Leader Fellowship Program, Farmington, Granby, Guilford, Meriden, Shelton, South Windsor, Stamford, Wallingford, Windham and Woodbridge) focused on preparing our students for the challenges of the mid-to-late 21st Century in the context of innovation.

The committee will post ideas and share resources on the CAPSS website, will collaborate with each other, host the Igniting Innovation Conference and more.

Follow all the Committee's work here

2019 Igniting Innovation graphic

Connecticut Schools Most Innovative Practices, Building Our Future Together

March 8, 2019 
8:30am - 12:30pm

University of Bridgeport
84 Iranistan Avenue
Bridgeport, CT 

The keynote speaker is Jon Landis, a thought leader from Apple.

Additional speakers will include:

Berj Akian, CEO of ClassLink.

Dr. Ronald Beghetto, an internationally recognized expert on creative thought and action in education.  He serves as Professor of Educational Psychology and Director of Innovation House at the University of Connecticut.

Register Now

This is the third installment of the Connecticut High School Graduation Requirements Unpacked series. This seven-part series, created in collaboration with the Great Schools Partnership, unpacks the graduation requirements that were passed by the Connecticut General Assembly in 2017, provides resources for implementation, and questions for your considerations as you and your community work toward full implementation for the class of 2023.

This week’s topic is Flexible and Multiple Pathways.

View/download this brief

This is the second installment of the Connecticut High School Graduation Requirements Unpacked series. This seven-part series, created in collaboration with the Great Schools Partnership, unpacks the graduation requirements that were passed by the Connecticut General Assembly in 2017, provides resources for implementation, and questions for your considerations as you and your community work toward full implementation for the class of 2023.

This week’s topic is the Elements of Effective Instruction.

View/download this brief

To Connecticut 5th Grade Educators:

The Connecticut State Police Clearinghouse for Information on Missing Children & Missing Endangered Adults and U.S. Department of Justice invites all Connecticut 5th graders to participate in the 2019 National Missing Children’s Day Poster Contest.

The National Missing Children’s Day Poster Contest is a nationwide contest designed to promote awareness among teachers, parents/guardians and children and engage them in discussions about safety. May 25 is National Missing Children's Day, dedicated to encouraging parents, guardians, caregivers, and others to ensure that child safety is a priority.

The poster contest is open to 5th graders at all schools (including home schools), school districts, local governing bodies, PTAs, Boys & Girls Clubs, or other organizations with 5th graders.  

The state winner will receive a national award certificate from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and his or her poster will be selected to go to the national judging competition. The national winner, his/her teacher and parents/guardians, and the state manager will be invited to Washington, D.C., to participate in the U.S. DOJ‛s National Missing Children‛s Day ceremony on May 22, 2019.

Missing Children’s Day Packet information can be found at:

https://ncjtc-static.fvtc.edu/resources/RS00005796.pdf

February 22, 2019, is the strict deadline for submissions to the CT State Police!

Submissions must be complete with poster, poster contest application (pages 6-7 of packet) and parent/guardian release consent form (page 8 of packet).

Each participating location will need to complete an internal selection process and mail the Top Five (5) posters per location/school with required documents to:  

Connecticut State Police
Public Information Office
1111 Country Club Road
Middletown CT 06457

If you have any questions, email Cathy Hinsch

More information

The Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents is pleased to announce the release of Connecticut High School Graduation Requirements Unpacked. This seven-part series, created in collaboration with the Great Schools Partnership, unpacks the graduation requirements that were passed by the Connecticut General Assembly in 2017, provides resources for implementation, and questions for your considerations as you and your community work toward full implementation for the class of 2023.

The first brief is an introduction to the series, an outline of the updates to the statute, and an overview of the coming briefs.

View/download this brief

Ledyard Public Schools logo

Right At School is proud to announce the launch of before and afterschool programming at Ledyard School District in Ledyard, CT. Led by a mission to inspire a love of learning, support schools and give parents peace of mind, Right At School provides safe, engaging, and meaningful in-school and extracurricular programs that enrich the lives of students and enable schools to focus on their academic mission.

Launching in January 2019, Right At School will be partnering with Ledyard School District to offer before and afterschool enrichment programs to service the Ledyard community for K-8 students.   “We are excited about providing this additional service to support our Ledyard families”, says Jay Hartling, Superintendent of Ledyard School District. “We want to make sure that our working families have quality, affordable, and flexible afterschool care available when they need it.”

Right At School’s programs provide students with enrichment activities as well as opportunities to dive into student-led projects, develop peer leadership skills, finish homework, get outside for fitness, and explore personal interests.

For more information on Right At School, visit www.rightatschool.com.

For more information on Ledyard School District, visit www.ledyard.net.

Right At School logo
CT School Breakfast Summit graphic

Thursday, January 10, 2019   •   The Aqua Turf Club, Plantsville, Connecticut

Are you READY to operate a federally compliant School Breakfast Program? Get your schools SET to deliver breakfast to your students, and take action to GROW breakfast participation in your schools! The 2019 CT School Breakfast Summit explores various breakfast tools, resources, and support while providing you with unbeatable peer networking opportunities to share breakfast wisdom and foster continued excellence and academic achievement for Connecticut’s students!

Download the flyer for more information/registration

ccsu building

SAVE THE DATE!

Thursday, March 7, 2019 - 3:30 p.m.  •  Founders Hall Meeting Room in Davidson Hall

Learn about Central Connecticut State University’s Connecticut Superintendent Certificate Program

A panel of highly regarded superintendents will share insights about the rewards and challenges of the superintendency, and share their experiences serving as a superintendent mentor in CCSU’s 093 program.

Download the flyer for more information/registration

UCONN PK-3 Leadership Program

The economic, academic, and societal benefits of quality early education are well documented.
 
Contemporary research in child development shows widespread evidence investments in early childhood education programs produce lifelong benefits. Creating coherent, integrated systems from PreK to grade 3 have shown learning gaps can be reduced, achievement and opportunities for success enhanced.
 
As a participant in this program, you will become a critical spokesperson for advancements in PreK-3rd grade, which will contribute to better student outcomes at all grade levels and into adulthood.
 
But which investments are most valuable? How do I support adult learning in a systemic way? How do I communicate the value of early childhood programs in my community? How do I engage families in ways that matter?
 
This is where we come in. We’ve created an executive style program to help you bring new skills and leadership to your school, district, and community. You will: 

  • Create plans to improve coherence and quality of early learning based on a comprehensive PreK-3rd grade approach.
  • Observe classroom instruction to identify both quality indicators as well as practices that interfere with learning.
  • Lead with a focus on reduced achievement gaps and socially just classrooms.
  • Clearly and credibly communicate strategies and benefits to diverse stakeholders in schools, districts, communities, and across the state.


Visit our website to register

If anyone was under the impression that Girl Scouting had disappeared from the landscape or was only about little girls selling cookies by the Stop and Shop, take another look at Girl Scouting today. As we think about some of the challenges that all girls face today around gender equity, self-esteem, embracing STEM studies, and becoming strong, self-determined young women, Girl Scouting has evolved to address those relevant issues bringing research-driven, evidence-based programming that complements a girl’s academic experience, but with an important single-gender lens.

Read more

The Director of Technology for Fairfield Public Schools (CT) shared the benefits of managing digital resources with ClassLink: “By being able to present resources in a simple, easy format and making access as simple as a single click, teachers not only save time in the classroom, they have great confidence in using the resources available to them. And students are able to engage with technology in a way never before seen in the district. The transition has been comprehensive and transformative for our district.”

Find out more

Every December, public school students, parents, teachers and administrators face the difficult task of acknowledging the various religious and secular holiday traditions celebrated during that time of year. Participants will learn strategies to promote greater understanding and respect among students of different traditions by taking care to adhere to the requirements of the First Amendment. We will not confine the discussion to December; we will discuss the challenges and opportunities of increasingly diverse student bodies and what every principal should know. Participants can learn best practices, legal requirements and hear from an interfaith panel on how to create a welcoming school environment around holiday time.

This no cost workshop is sponsored by CAS, CABE and CAPSS.

Registration questions, please contact Noreen Liberopoulos at nliberopoulos@casciac.org.

Date: November 2, 2018
Time: 8:00 am - 11:30 am
Site: Connecticut Association of Schools, 30 Realty Drive, Cheshire, CT 06410 - Conference Room C2, Lower Level
Registration Deadline: October 30, 2018
Cost: No Charge

View/Download the Flyer

Online Registration

casia_esa logo

CASIA is pleased to offer the 23rd ANNUAL POLICE / FIRE SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS to two deserving and qualified high school seniors graduating in June 2019. Connecticut’s first prize will be $1000 and the second prize $500. CASIA’s first place winner will be automatically entered in to the Electronic Security Association (ESA) Youth Scholarship Program where the prizes are $7,500 (1st) and $2,500 (2nd).

Read the flyer

Online application

Discovering Amistad logo

The Amistad replica, built in Mystic, Connecticut and launched in 2000 provides an historic backdrop for three in-class lessons for students in Grades 3 – 12 which include the journey of the Mende people, their struggle for freedom and how this journey of freedom resonates in today’s world.

Our educators provide our proprietary program on-site in your classrooms along with an interactive sail aboard the Amistad.

Read more in our flyer

Connecticut's Kid Governor 2018-2019 logo

Fifth-grade teachers are invited to register their classes to participate in Connecticut's Kid Governor®, an award-winning statewide civics program created by the Connecticut Democracy Center. This free, in-class civics program teaches 5th-grade students about state government, voting and elections, and civic engagement through the annual election of a Kid Governor. The program takes place right from the comfort of the classroom and registered teachers receive Toolkits of lesson plans that guide them through the entire program. Schools can participate by nominating one student candidate in the election, voting in the election, or both.

Kid Governor is an authentic, immersive experience that teaches students about the democratic process by giving them a voice in a real election. Are schools in your district registered to participate yet? Check our participation map HERE to find out!

To learn more and to register your class, please visit CT.KidGovernor.org or email Brian.Cofrancesco@kidgovernor.org.
 

Strategic Plan graphic for post

CAPSS will advance a bold vision of student learning, organizational improvement, and executive district leadership, one that can guide the practice of the profession and deepen public debates and push toward a sound policy that supports outcomes beneficial to our students and in line with CAPSS’ strategic priorities.  In addition, CAPSS will provide high-quality and high-impact services to its membership, making sure superintendents and executive district leaders obtain necessary technical assistance and professional learning.

Read the Plan

ClassLink logo

ClassLink Joins CAPSS as Elite Busines Partner
ClassLink empowers your students and teachers with instant access to their learning resources. ClassLink® OneClick® includes a library of over 6,000 single sign-on apps and instant links to file folders at school and on Google, Office 365, and Dropbox cloud drives. ClassLink Analytics gives decision makers the usage data they need. ClassLink Roster Server easily and securely delivers class rosters to any publisher using open technology standards. ClassLink OneSync automates account provisioning and provides bidirectional account syncing. Accessible from any computer, tablet or smartphone, ClassLink is ideal for 1to1 and Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiatives.

www.classlink.com

Contact:
Gregg Calvaruso
Director of Marketing


Logo for Shipman & Goodwin LLP, Counselors at Law

Shipman & Goodwin LLP Joins CAPSS as Premier Business Partner
Shipman & Goodwin LLP has more than 170 attorneys with five offices in Connecticut, an office in New York and Washington, D.C. The firm is recognized nationally for the depth and breadth of our education practice. Our school law attorneys represent over 125 public school districts and educational entities. Our online resource, www.ctschoollaw.com is dedicated to presenting the latest developments in school law.

www.shipmangoodwin.com

Contact:
Thomas B. Mooney, Esq.
Partner


Spur logo

CAPPS Welcomes SPUR as a Basic Business Partner
Spur is a staffing company for schools. We use our very own workforce management software to improve support and substitute staffing services and to save districts a significant amount on staffing costs. We are not only focused on providing a great experience for schools, but also on investing more into our workers in the form of better employee engagement, training, and benefits so they can have more control over their work life.

www.spurjobs.com

Contact:
Laura Slayton
Customer Development Rep

 

Fran Rabinowitz, Executive Director of CAPSS, and Abdul-Rahmaan Muhammad, Executive Director of My People Clinical Services, shown receiving The 2018 Champion of Children Award presented to Connecticut leaders who demonstrate an outstanding commitment to improving the lives of impoverished and vulnerable children in our state.

Dr. Rabinowitz was honored by the Center for Children's Advocacy at their Spring for Kids Connecticut Champion of Children Awards at Infinity Music Hall in Hartford on Tuesday evening.

Complete Press Release

Rob Rader, Executive Director, CABE, and Fran Rabinowitz, Executive Director, CAPSS, were recently interviewed on Fox 61, The Real Story, discussing ideas for making Connecticut schools safer. Watch the interview (above).

Representatives from CAPSS, the Connecticut Association of Boards of Education (CABE) and the Connecticut Education Association (CEA), Hartford, joined together with superintendents, teachers and students at a press conference in East Hartford High School today to express concern and anger for the lack of progress made by politicians in combating gun violence in schools and to call for legislative change following the events in Florida last week.

Read the complete statement

CAPSS advances its 2018 Public Policy Agenda for purposes of fostering equity, excellence and innovation in Connecticut’s public schools in alignment with a vision that articulates an education that is personalized so that all children learn what they need to know and be able to do to be successful in post high school endeavors.

Priority recommendations include:

  • State Budget
  • Unfunded Mandates
  • Personalized & Mastery Based Learning

Other recommendations include:

  • Special Education
  • Acceptance of All Students
  • Alliance District Funds
  • Virtual Net Metering
  • Student Data Privacy Act
  • Disclosure of Personnel Records
  • Statutory Time Requirement Regarding the Programs Provided for Students who are Expelled
  • School District Leadership

View/download the complete report

Charting New Frontiers in Student-Centered Learning is a report meant to capture and contribute to a conversation already taking place across Connecticut. We hope it serves as a way to engage and invite others, across a diverse ecosystem of change agents and practitioners, to envision and advance the learner-centered experiences all students deserve.

We invite you to share the publication with your networks and on social media, and we welcome your feedback.

Download or view the report


This report is produced by Innovation Partners America in partnership with the Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents (CAPSS) and the Connecticut Commission for Educational Technology (CET).

Fran Rabinowitz spoke with Ray Dunaway of WTIC recently voicing concerns over issues within the state budget and its profound impact on everyone from Boards of Ed through superintendents, teachers and students in Connecticut.

Audio file may be listened to below.

 

 

 

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