Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 5611 | WWW.CAPSS.ORG ACTION STEPS 4 Professional learning for educators will address readiness standards for college, career, and citizenship. 4 The state and districts will develop rigorous classroom assessments (both formative and summative) that allow learners to demonstrate mastery of world-class standards. 4 Schools will help students live and work in a global society by teaching them about other cultures (both within the U.S. and globally) as well as the history, geography, and languages of other cultures. 4 Schools will provide technology and expect students to utilize it so they acquire the skills required to compete in a global economy. 4 State standards will be approved for all content areas. For specific recommendations on Raise the Bar see Appendix page 40. Current Status In Connecticut, Core Standards for Mathematics and English Language Arts were implemented in 2013. Since 2010, across the state high school graduate rates have improved 5.2%, to 87%.8 In 2015, graduation rates increased for nearly every group, and Connecticut leads the nation in closing achievement gaps around high school graduation.9 (The one exception involved English Language Learners, whose graduation rate slipped .8%) In addition, in 2013, Connecticut’s 12th graders achieved the highest scores in English Language Arts on the National Assessment of Education Progress.10 Raise the Bar [continued] 11 | WWW.CAPSS.ORG