Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 569 | WWW.CAPSS.ORG Why is this important? Students in Connecticut will grow up to live and work in a global society that will require skills and knowledge that schools are now incorporating into curricula. Children learn when they are provided with high-quality and equitable education opportunities. Investing in ways that enhance these opportunities shows the greater promise for addressing the nation’s achievement gap. To prepare students for post-secondary education, careers, and citizenship in the 21st Century, teaching and learning must be aligned to academic standards and curricula that have been benchmarked against those in high-performing school systems in this and other nations.6 Within a balanced curriculum, students learn traditional academic subjects as well as art, physical education, technology, and life skills. Rather than adding courses, skills are integrated into academic content. An integrated, benchmarked curriculum will raise the achievement of all students.7 The Vision Students in Connecticut are prepared for the global economy through robust and coordinated “anytime, anywhere” learning opportunities that help them communicate, collaborate and foster their abilities to be creative and think critically. Raise The Bar 9 | WWW.CAPSS.ORG